About This Site

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Highly honored sir, you call Joachim only the leading German violinist? I find him to be the leading performing musician altogether — an ideal of perfection. With his incomparable mastery he has terrified me and laid me low — but the feeling of artistic elevation that I owe to him won out in the end.

Hans von Bülow to Franz Wüllner, 1 December, 1866
(Berlin SBPK: Mus. ep. Hans von Bülow 1537)


This website is dedicated to the life and art of Joseph Joachim. The information on the site derives from my ongoing research and writing, which I am publishing here in the JJLesendpsspirit of modern, open-source scholarship. For copyright reasons having to do with source material, some of it remains password protected, and not available to the public. Information on this site is grouped in categories. The detailed Biographical Posts begin here (“Kittsee, 1831”), and continue as a series of linked articles. There are some gaps in the links — this is, as I say, an ongoing project. A Brief Biography begins below (“Joseph Joachim”).

In general, if you wish to use anything you see on this site, especially copyright material, please acknowledge the source. Those few with whom I have shared protected information are requested to keep their password secret, and not to make public any information that is not already in the public domain.

The WordPress blog format does not allow me to organize posts as I wish: it organizes posts by date, which is to say, randomly. I am, however, linking the Biographical Posts in sequence, and organizing all of the material in the INDEX. Content is also searchable using the “search” function.

I wish to acknowledge the invaluable and generous support of the University of New Hampshire, without which this work would not have been possible.

unh_logo_lrgRobert W. Eshbach
Associate Professor of Music Emeritus
University of New Hampshire
reshbach (at) unh.edu


Now available from Boydell & Brewer: The Creative Worlds of Joseph Joachim, Valerie Woodring Goertzen and Robert Whitehouse Eshbach, editors

Contents

Introduction: The Creative Worlds of Joseph Joachim
Robert Whitehouse Eshbach

PART ONE: Identity

1. “Of the Highest Good”: Joachim’s Relationship to Mendelssohn
R. Larry Todd
2. Joseph Joachim and His Jewish Dilemma
Styra Avins
3. Joachim and Romani Musicians: Their Relationship and Common Features in Performance Practice
Mineo Ota

PART TWO: Joachim as Performer

4. Joachim’s Violins: Spotlights on Some of Them
Ruprecht Kamlah
5. (Re-)Enchanting Performance: Joachim and the Spirit of Beethoven
Karen Leistra-Jones
6. “Thou That Hast Been in England Many a Year”: The British Joachim
Ian Maxwell
7. Joachim at the Crystal Palace
Michael Musgrave
8. “Music Was Poured by Perfect Ministrants”: Joseph Joachim at the Monday Popular Concerts, London
Therese Ellsworth
9. “Das Quartett-Spiel ist doch wohl mein eigentliches Fach”: Joseph Joachim and the String
Quartet
Robert Riggs
10. Professor Joachim and His Pupils
Sanna Pederson
11. Performers as Authors of Music History: Joseph and Amalie Joachim
Beatrix Borchard
12. At the Intersection of Performance and Composition: Joseph Joachim and Brahms’s Piano
Quartet in A Major, Op. 26, Movement III
William P. Horne

PART THREE: Joachim as Composer

13. Re-considering the Young Composer-Performer Joseph Joachim, 1841-53
Katharina Uhde
14. “Franz Liszt gewidmet”: Joseph Joachim’s G-minor Violin Concerto, Op. 3
Vasiliki Papadopoulou
15. Drama and Music in Joachim’s Overture to Shakespeare’s Henry IV
Valerie Woodring Goertzen
16. “So Gleams the Past, the Light of Other Days”: Joachim’s Hebräische Melodien for Viola and Piano, Op. 9 (1853)
Marie Sumner Lott
17. Tovey’s View of Joachim’s “Hungarian” Violin Concerto
Robert Riggs
Bibliography
Index


Desiderata: 

bn_joachim1) I am trying to locate the correspondence between Joseph Joachim and Bettina von Arnim that was sold by Henrici auction house in 1929. [Karl Ernst Henrici, Versteigerungskatalog 155, Berlin: am 5. Juli 1929.] I would be very grateful for any information leading to its whereabouts.

2) I am interested in finding birth records from the Kittsee Kehilla from the late 1820s to the early 1830s. As far as I know, birth records exist only from the mid 1830s onward — too late to include Joachim.

3) I would be very grateful to hear from the owner of Joachim’s Hamlet overture, sold at Sotheby’s on June 9, 2010.

4) I would like to find Margaret Alsager Ayrton’s unpublished diary.

5) I am always interested in seeing letters, photographs, memorabilia, etc. connected with Joachim. Please email me at the above address.

6) I am interested in the whereabouts of the painting by Felix Possart of the Joachim Quartet in the Singakademie zu Berlin (1903).

7)

guernier_joseph_joachim-the_young_violinist~OMe00300~10620_20080913_09-13-08_57

Joseph Joachim at the time of his Adelskasino debut

This priceless historical artifact was erroneously sold by Stair Galleries on September 13, 2008 as “Joseph Joachim Guernier — The Young Violinist,” “Oil on panel, 8 3/4 x 6 3/4 in. Provenance: Property from the New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations.” It’s whereabouts are currently unknown.

Thank you! RWE


Joachim Before and After copy

Photo: Reutlinger Paris

Photo restoration: Chris Whitehouse
Man Cave Pictures

Nur das Bedeutungslose fährt dahin,
Was einmal tief lebendig ist und war,
Das hat Kraft zu sein für immerdar.

Only the meaningless passes away.
That which is and was once deeply alive
Has the power to be for eternity

Joseph Joachim in Agathe von Siebold Schütte’s Stammbuch, Fall, 1894

Joseph Joachim

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JJHanfstaengelPSCrop copy

JOSEPH JOACHIM

* 28 June 1831 Kittsee (Kopčany/Köpcsény) Hungary (now Austria)

† 15 August 1907 Berlin

Violinist, Composer, Conductor, and Pedagogue. Founding director of the Königlich Akademischen Hochschule für ausübende Tonkunst (now Universität der Künste) Berlin. Joachim studied violin with Stanisław Serwaczyński and Joseph Böhm; composition with Gottfried Preyer and Moritz Hauptmann. He was a protégé of Felix Mendelssohn and Robert Schumann, and, in the early 1850s, Franz Liszt. In adulthood, he became a close friend and collaborator of Johannes Brahms and a celebrated opponent of the New German School of Wagner and Liszt. He is widely regarded as one of the most significant and influential musical personalities of the long 19th century.


LIFE

Screen Shot 2015-08-21 at 12.01.39 PMoseph Joachim was born in Kittsee (Kopčany/Köpcsény) Hungary, in what is now the Burgenland region of Austria. He was the seventh child of Fanny (Franziska) Figdor Joachim (* ca. 1791 — † 1867), the daughter of a prominent Kittsee wool wholesaler then residing in Vienna, and Julius Friedrich Joachim (* ca. 1791 — † 1865), also a wool merchant, born 20 miles to the south in the town of Frauenkirchen (Boldogasszony). [1] Joachim’s birth date, now commonly accepted as June 28, 1831, has never been authenticated. [2]

Joachim was an Austro-Hungarian Jew, whose ancestors had been banished from SynagogueVienna by Emperor Leopold I in the early 1670s and settled in the Kittsee Kehilla, one of the culturally prominent Sheva Kehillot (“Seven Jewish Communities”) that arose in the late 17th century, and stood under the protectorate of the powerful Esterházy family[3] The Sheva Kehillot were among the wealthiest of the Hungarian Jewish communities, and their members were among the best-educated of Hungary’s Jews. Many were traders, who enjoyed considerably more privileges than the ghetto Jews of nearby Pressburg (Bratislava). As merchants, they travelled freely throughout the region, maintaining close contact with Vienna’s Jewish population, as well as with the large numbers of their co-religionists in Pressburg and Pest. In the early 1820’s Joachim’s maternal grandparents, Isaac (* 1768 — † 1850) and Anna (* 1770 — † 1833) Figdor, left Kittsee and settled in the Viennese Vorstadt of Leopoldstadt, the district along the Danube canal that was home to most of Vienna’s Jewish population. That the Figdors, as Jews, were permitted to live in Vienna at that time, before the loosening of residential restrictions in 1848, is an indication of special status, and suggests affluence. [4] Amongst the Figdors’ other grandchildren was Fanny Figdor Wittgenstein, the mother of the industrialist Karl Wittgenstein and the grandmother of the pianist Paul Wittgenstein and the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. Fanny Wittgenstein served as a surrogate mother to Joachim throughout much of his youth.

In 1833, the Joachim family settled in Pest, then the capital of Hungary’s thriving wool industry. [5] Joseph’s interest in music was stimulated by hearing his older sister, who studied voice and accompanied herself on the guitar. He became fixated on the violin when his father brought him a toy violin from a fair.

[See More]

© Robert W. Eshbach 2014


[1] The siblings were: Friedrich (*1812 — †1882, m. Regine Just *1825 — †1883), Josephine (*1816 — †1883, m. Thali Ronay), Julie (*1821 — †1901, m. Joseph Singer, *ca. 1818 — †1870), Heinrich (*1825 — †1897, m. Ellen Margaret Smart *ca. 1844 — †1925), Regina (*ca. 1827 — †1862, m. William Östereicher,  *ca. 1817, and later Wilhelm Joachim, *ca. 1812 — †1858), Johanna (*1829 — †1883, m. Lajos György Arányi, *1812 — †1877 and later Johann Rechnitz, *ca. 1812), and Joseph  (*1831 — †1907, m. Amalie Marie Schneeweiss *1839 — †1899). An 1898 interview with Joachim [Musical Times, April 1, 1898, p. 225] claims that Joachim was “the youngest of seven children.” In his authorized biography, however, Andreas Moser claims that Joseph was “the seventh of Julius and Fanny Joachim’s eight children.” The name and fate of the eighth and last sibling is unknown.

[2] Joachim himself was unsure of his birth date. For the first 23 years of his life, he believed he had been born in July — either the 15th or the 24th (Carl Ferdinand Becker, for example, in his Die Tonkünstler des Neunzehnten Jahrhunderts, (Leipzig, 1849, p. 82), gives Joachim’s birthdate as July 15, 1831. Joachim was living in Leipzig at the time, and was, undoubtedly, the source of this information). Joachim apparently discovered the date of June 28 after receiving a Hochzeit-Geburts-Schein from Kittsee (see letter to Clara Schumann dated 21 August, 1863 [Schumann/BRIEFEDITION II, 2.1, p. 735]. Joachim’s boyhood friend Edmund (Ödön) Singer (* 14 October 1831, Totis, Hungary — † 1912) also calls into question the year of Joachim’s birth. “All reference books gave 1831 as Joachim’s birth year, as well as the birth-year of my humble self. […] Joachim himself asked me one day: ‘How does it happen that we are always mentioned as having been born in the same year?  I am at least a year older than you!’ — I, myself, finally established my glorious birth-year after many years, while Joachim tacitly allowed the wrong date to persist.” [Edmund Singer, “Aus meiner Künstlerlaufbahn,” Neue Musik-Zeitung (Stuttgart), Vol. 32, No. 1, (1911), p. 8.]

[3] Deutschkreutz, Eisenstadt, Frauenkirchen, Kittsee, Kobersdorf, Lackenbach and Mattersburg (Hungarian: Német-Keresztur, Kismarton, Boldogasszony, Köpcsény, Kábold, Lakompak and Nagy Marton, respectively). Before 1924, Mattersburg was called Mattersdorf. Principal among these closely cooperating communities was Eisenstadt (Kismarton).

[4] Joseph’s maternal grandparents were Isaac [Israel, Isak] Figdor [Avigdor, Vigdor, Victor] (*1768 — †1850), k.k. priv. Großhändler [Imperial and Royal Wholesaler], and Anna Jafé-Schlesinger Figdor (*1770 — †April 12, 1833). Isaac and Anna had ten children: Regine, Karoline, Ferdinand, Fanny, Michael, Nathan, Bernhard, Wilhelm, Eduard, and Samuel. [E. Randol Schoenberg, GENI website: http://www.geni.com/people/Isak-Figdor/6000000008300436213?through=6000000007800493942 accessed 2/14/2011.]

[5] Wool was one of Hungary’s principal articles of commerce and a major source of capital for the Hungarian economy, primarily because it was one of the few export commodities that the Austrian government did not tax. Due to improved farming methods and the introduction of Spanish merino sheep to the region, Hungarian wool was of exceptional quality and highly prized by English woolen manufacturers. Each year, nearly 9 million pounds of wool were offered for sale at the spring trade fair in Pest, most of it bought by German merchants for resale in England. This trade in wool was largely carried on by strategically networked Jewish families, many of whom, like the Figdors, had relatives placed in each of the wool-trading capitals of Europe. The Figdor family connections extended from Pest and Vienna to Leipzig, London, and Leeds. This network of family and business connections was critical to the establishment, guidance, and promotion of Joachim’s musical career, which in its early years, not coincidentally, was centered in those same cities.

Robert Bridges: To Joseph Joachim

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could not be unframed in S.E.

To Joseph Joachim

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elov’d of all to whom that Muse is dear
Who hid her spirit of rapture from the Greek,
Whereby our art excelleth the antique,
Perfecting formal beauty to the ear;
Thou that hast been in England many a year
The interpreter who left us nought to seek,
Making Beethoven’s inmost passion speak,
Bringing the soul of great Sebastian near.
Their music liveth ever, and ’tis just
That thou, good Joachim, so high thy skill,
Rank (as thou shalt upon the heavenly hill)
Laurel’d with them, for thy ennobling trust
Remember’d when thy loving hand is still
And every ear that heard thee stopt with dust.

Robert Bridges, May 2, 1904
First published in the Times, May 17, 1904, p. 11

Portrait of Joseph Joachim (1904)
John Singer Sargent
American, 1856-1925
Oil on canvas. 87.6 x 73.0 (34 1/2 x 28 3/4 in.).
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Wood 1928 901
©Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto


JJ Conf.

Joseph Joachim’s Concerts


Joseph Joachim’s Concerts

 

An incomplete list, subject to expansion and revision.
Dates follow the format: day/month/year.

For further reference, an extensive collection of programs exists online at: http://www.concertprogrammes.org.uk/collections/?cbq=Joseph+Joachim
Other major periodical archives contain hundreds of concert notices and reviews.

AHRC Arts & Humanities Research Council Concert Programmes [Cardiff University and Royal College of Music]

ALP April Lane Prince Dissertation

JJ Joseph Joachim — Biography and Research

JJC Joseph Joachim Collection

NZfM Neue Zeitschrift für Musik

SB Schumann Briefedition, Serie II Köln: Dohr, 2019, 2 vols. 


1839

guernier_joseph_joachim-the_young_violinist~OMe00300~10620_20080913_09-13-08_57

17/3/1839: Adelskasino, Pest
Debut recital. Joseph Joachim, Stanislaus Serwaczyński; Johann Friedrich Eck Double Concerto, Franz Pechaˇcek Variations on Schubert’s Trauerwalzer. Ref: JJ

1840

25/3/1840 [Der Adler, Vienna, 30/3/1840 p. 6]:

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1843

30/4/1843 Royal Redoutensaal, Vienna
Fourth ever subscription concert of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Vieuxtemps Violin Concerto no. 4 in D Minor; Adagio religioso and Finale marziale 

16/11/1843 Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Seventh Subscription Concert of the Gewandhaus Orchestra, Ernst: Othello Fantasie. Ref: NZfM, 11/12/1843, p. 3. /AmZ , 12/1843, no. 49, p. 888. Program: Stadtgeschichtliches Museum, Leipzig. 

1844

Joachim Daguerreotype

29/1/1844: Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Concert by Charlotte Birch (as assisting artist). Spohr, Violin Concerto no. 8 op. 47 Gesangscene. Ref: AmZ No. 5 (31 January 1844): 74-75. Program included Cherubini Ouverture zum Wasserträger, Arie von Marliani, Bellini Arie aus der Sonnambula, Beethoven Ouverture zu Fidelio (No. 4, E dur), Englische und schottische Nationallieder, Moscheles Hommage à Handel, Duo für zwei Pianoforte, Rode Variationen (Miss Birch).

7/6/1844: Princess’ Concert Room, London
G. A. Macfarren’s and J. W. Davison’s Third Concert of Chamber Music. Mendelssohn Trio in D Minor, op. 49 (Joachim, Mendelssohn, Hausmann), Bach Adagio and Fugue G Minor, BWV 1001, Mendelssohn Quartet in D, op. 44 (Joachim, Goffrie, Hill, Hausmann); program also included songs by Mendelssohn and Macfarren, sung by Marshall, Dolby, and Rainforth.

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29/11/1844Soirée at Herman Härtel’s house, Leipzig
Mendelssohn Octet with Joachim. Ref: Friedrich Schmidt, Das Musikleben der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft Leipzigs im Vormärz (1815-1848), Langensalza: Beyer & Mann, 1912. 181.

1845

Wilhelm Girtner Portrait2

18/10/1845: Gewandhaus, Leipzig
A Beethoven string quartet, together with David, Gade, and Grabau. Concert given by Lisa B. Cristiani. Ref: Program Stadtgeschichtliches Museum, Leipzig.

10/11/1845: Hôtel de Saxe, Dresden
JJ plays Mendelssohn’s violin concerto and David’s Variations on Schubert’s Lob der Thränen for Violin and Orchestra, op. 15 under Robert Schumann’s direction. This Dresden premiere would be Joseph’s first performance of the Mendelssohn Concerto, and the third public performance of the work outright.

4/12/1845Gewandhaus Leipzig
Adagio und Rondo für die Violine mit Orchester, komponiert und vorgetragen von Herrn Joseph Joachim; Caprice für die Violine mit Orchesterbegleitung, über ein Thema aus dem Piraten von Bellini, komponiert von H.W. Ernst, gespielt von Herrn Joseph Joachim. Conducted by Felix Mendelssohn; the only performance at which Mendelssohn performed a work of Joachim’s publicly.

Erster Theil: Symphonie von W.A. Mozart (D dur, ohne Menuett ; Arie aus Norma von Bellini [Keusche Göttin, im silbernen Glanze], gesungen von Fräulein Jenny Lind ; Adagio und Rondo für die Violine mit Orchester, componiert und vorgetragen von Herrn Joseph Joachim ; Duett aus “I Capuleti e Montechi” von Bellini [Si, fuggire!], gesungen von Fräulein Jenny Lind und Miss Helene Dolby — Zweiter Theil: Ouverture zu Oberon von C. Maria von Weber ; Recitativ und Arie aus Don Juan von Mozart [Ich grausam! .. Ueber Alles bleibst du theuer], gesungen von Fräulein Lind ; Caprice für die Violine mit Orchesterbegleitung, über ein Thema aus dem Piraten von Bellini, componirt von H.W. Ernst, gespielt von Herrn Joseph Joachim — Lieder mit Pianofortebegleitung, gesungen von Fräulein Lind.

Ref: Program, Morgan Library  Accession Number PMC 1187

1846

11/1/1846: Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, Vienna
Ref: Wiener Zeitung, No. 11 (11 January, 1846), p. 84.

Screenshot 2016-06-21 16.21.22

1847

9/2/1847: Dresden, Saxony
Joachim’s first public performance of the Bach Chaconne.
Ref: Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung (Nr. 43), Friday, 12 February, 1847, p. 369.

Screenshot 2017-07-28 15.53.09

18/2/1847: Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Seventeenth Subscription Concert. Historical concert (composers from before a century ago). Bach: Adagio and Fugue in G minor; Chaconne (Joachim’s second public performance). Ref: Programs, Stadtgeschichtliches Museum, Leipzig

19/4/1847: Beethoven Rooms, London
Beethoven Quartet Society. Beethoven: Quartet in C minor, Op. 18, No. 4; Quartet in E flat Major, Op. 74; Quartet in A minor, Op. 132. Ref. The Musical World, No. 22 (24 April, 1847), p. 262.

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7/6/1847: Liverpool, England

Liverpool Mercury: Friday, June 11, 1847, p. 326:

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21/6/1847: Manchester, England
Mendelssohn Violin Concerto, Ernst Adagio and Rondo. Ref: Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser, Wednesday, 23 June, 1847.

1848

11/3/1848: Hamburg
Beethoven Violin Concerto, Ernst Otello Fantasie. The concert is attended by the young Johannes Brahms, who hears Joachim for the first time.
Hamburger Nachrichten of 27 March gives a concert review: “In dem Violin-Virtuosen Hrn. J. Joachim, der das Beethoven’sche Violin-Concert und die bekannte Othello-Phantasie von Ernst vortrug, lernte unser Publikum einen Künstler von bedeutendem Talent und der solidesten Kunstrichtung kennen. Die Bemerkung, daß derselbe das großartige Beethovensche Concert — ein Werk, für das sich in mehr denn einer Beziehung wohl der Name Concert-Symphonie eignen möchte — in vortrefflicher Auffassung und sicherer Haltung mit Geschmack, mit Geist und Gefühl ausführte, zeigt den Standpunct dieses Künstlers zur Genüge an und macht jede weitere Erörterung überflüssig. Der laute Beifall aller Anwesenden, dessen er sich zu erfreuen hatte, war nur eine gerechte Anerkennung der ausgezeichneten Leistung —” Ref

19/10/1848: Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Weber, Overture to “Freischütz;” Mozart, Recitative and Aria sung by Minna Marpurg; Beethoven Violin Concerto (Joachim); Spohr, Finale from the opera “Zemire und Azor,” sung by Minna and Auguste Marburg, Frl. Stark, Herrn Wideman and Behr; Ferdinand David, Symphony after Goethe’s poem “Verschiedene Empfindungen auf einem Platze” (new, manuscript).  Ref: Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung, No. 291 (17 December 1848) p. 3824.

17/12/1848: Leipzig
“Am 17. Dec. veranstaltete die blinde Sängerin Frl. Anna Zinggeler aus Zürich ein Morgenconcert in der Buchhändlerbörse. Ihre Leistungen waren anerkenneswerth und fanden Beifall. Unterstützt wurde das Concert durch die HH. Joachim und Behr, Kapellmeister Rietz begleitete. Ein Hr. Pelz aus Prag debütierte minder glücklich mit einer Composition wie sie das Leipziger Publicum nicht zu hören gewohnt ist.” Ref: Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung, No. 354 (19 December 1848) p. 4562

1849

30/4/1849: Philharmonic Society, Dublin
23rd season, 4th grand concert. Principal performers: Miss A. Williams, Miss M. Williams, Signor Marras, Herr Joachim. Leader: Mr. Levey. Conductor: Mr. Bussell. Ref

Dublin Evening Mail No. 4763, page 3 (2/5/1849):

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7/5/1849: The Globe No. 14,862, p. 3. (10/5/1849)

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7/5/1849: The Morning Post No. 23,532 (9/5/1849):
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30/9/1849: Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Mendelssohn Violin Concerto. Ref: Program Stadtgeschichtliches Museum, Leipzig.

10/12/1849Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Maurer Concerto for Four Violins. Ref: Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung (Nr. 346), Friday, 12 December, 1849, p. 3788

Screenshot 2017-07-28 16.21.03

1850

JJReutlingerPS1Sepia copy

19/10/1850: Hof-Theater, Weimar
Hof-Kapelle Weimar (Liszt), Joachim, Agthe, Coßmann, Graumann, Beethoven violin concerto, Joachim Fantasie über ungarische Motive. Ref: THULB

hungarian-fantasie-perf-weimar-copy

1851

16/2/1851 Hof-Theater, Weimar

1852

31/5/1852Philharmonic Society, London
Joachim, Mendelssohn Violin Concerto, Joachim Fantasia on Scottish Airs.  Ref: Bell’s,

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Review: London Evening Standard 1 June, 1852:

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12/6/1852Queen’s Concert Rooms, Hanover Square, London
Beethoven Violin Concerto, ‘Hungarian’ Fantasy, Paganini 24th Caprice. Ref: Illustrated London News, 12 June, 1852, p. 458; The Morning Advertiser, Saturday, 26 June, 1852, p. 6.

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23/6/1852: Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford
Joachim, Bottesini, various artists, Joachim Phantasie über ungarische Motive (Fantasia on Hungarian Airs). Ref: The Era.

25/6/1852: London, Hanover-square Rooms
Joachim, Ferd. Hiller cond., Beethoven violin concerto, Joachim Phantasie über ungarische Motive (Fantasia on Hungarian Airs). Ref: London Daily News.  Morning Chronicle.

13/11/1852: Joachim debuts in Hanover with Mendelssohn Concerto — audition concert for his new position. Ref: FMH 1853

8/1/1853: Hanover
Spohr Gesangscene. (Kömpel played Beethoven Concerto) Ref. and complete program: FMH

22/1/1853: Hanover
Spohr Gesangscene (Kömpel played Beethoven Concerto) Ref. and complete program: FMH

26/2/1853: Hanover
Bach Chaconne, Ernst Concerto Allegro Pathétique. Ref. and complete program: FMH

19/3/1853: Hanover
Ernst Othello Fantasie. Ref. and complete program: FMH

17/5/1853: Niederrheinische Musikfest, Düsseldorf
Beethoven Violin Concerto, Bach Chaconne (Mendelssohn arrangement, accompanied by Clara Schumann).

8/1853: Summer concerts in Göttingen
Der Humorist, 30 August 1853, p. 794:

 

25/10/1853:

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The Athenæum, 3968 (14 November 1903): 659

10/12/1853: Hanover
Beethoven Concerto. Ref. and complete program: FMH

20/12/1853: Casinosaal, Cologne
Ferdinand Hiller, conducting: Beethoven Concerto, unnamed composition of his own. Review: RMZ p. 1454.

22/12/1853: Casinosaal, Cologne
Recital Joachim, Hiller, and Koch for the benefit of “Herrn Clef, früheren Regisseurs des hiesigen Vaudeville – Theaters.” Joachim Romanze, Paganini 24th caprice, with Hiller Bach sonata in E Major, three Etudes by Hiller for Piano and Violin, and Beethoven Kreutzer Sonata. Ref: BMZ

1854

7/1/1854: Hof-Theater, Hanover
Joseph Joachim conducting: Franz Liszt Fantasie über Ungarische Volksmelodien; Hans von Bülow, pianist. Ref: LdK  FMH

21/1/1854: Hof-Theater, Hanover
Joachim, Schumann Fantasie. Ref. and complete program: FMH

4/3/1854: Hof-Theater, Hanover
Joachim, “Romanze v. Beethoven” “Präludium v. Bach,” “Capriccio v. Paganini.” Ref. and complete program: FMH

1/4/1854: Hof-Theater, Hanover
Joachim, Berlioz Romanze “Tendresse et Caprice.” Ref. and complete program: FMH

8/9/1854: Norderney
Concert with Jenny Lind to benefit the poor. Ref: Signale, vol. 12, no. 37 (September, 1854), p. 302

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10/12/1854: Singakademie, Berlin
Joachim and Clara Schumann joint recital. Ref: Neue Berliner Musikzeitung, vol. 8 no. 50, (13 December, 1854), p. 396:

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16/12/1854: Singakademie, Berlin
Second Joachim and Clara Schumann joint recital. Schumann Violin Sonata D Minor, Bach Prelude and Fugue for Violin Solo, Bach Prelude E Major, Paganini Caprice no. 24. Ref: ALP  Neue Berliner Musikzeitung, vol. 8 no. 51, (20 December, 1854), p. 403.

20/12/1854: Singakademie, Berlin
Third Joachim and Clara Schumann joint recital. Beethoven Romanze G Major, Bach, Sarabande and Double, Bach Bourée and Double, Schumann Fantasiestucke for Pianoforte and Violin, op. 73, Bach, Andante and Allegro from the Third Sonata for Violin, Beethoven, Violin Sonata C Minor, op. 30.

1856

JJ CDV 2

5/11/1856: Gasthof zur Stadt London, Göttingen
Joseph Joachim, Clara Schumann, Beethoven Sonata G Major, op. 96, Schubert 2 Moments musicals, op. 94 (pf.), Mendelssohn Scherzo à capriccio F sharp minor (pf.), Schumann Fantasie, op. 131, Mozart Sonata in A Major, Bach Adagio and Allegro (vln. solo), Schumann Carnaval, op. 9 (pf.). Ref: Michelmann/SIEBOLD, p. 112.

1857

14/2/1857: Hanover
All-Beethoven Program with Clara Schumann for King George V
Violin Sonata A Major, op. 47 (Kreutzer), Variations E flat Major, op. 35, Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major, op. 58, Violin Sonata C minor, op. 30/2. Ref: SB 2/1, p. 323. 

18/2/1857: Mengershausen’s Saal, Göttingen
J. O. Grimm (cond.), Clara Schumann, pno. Beethoven Sonata G Major (not known which), Bach Praeludium and Fugue. Ref: Michelmann/SIEBOLD, pp. 112-113.

22/11/1857: Hamburg Philharmonic

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Notice from Dwight’s Journal of Music, vol. 10, no. 15 (10 January 1857): 119

1858

1/6/1858: 7:45 p.m. Liverpool Philharmonic Society
Madame Viardot Garcia, Miss Kemble, Signor Luchesi, Joachim (“His first appearance in Liverpool since 1847”), J. Zeugheer Herrmann, cond. Ref: Liverpool Mail, (29 May, 1858).

1859

24/5/1859: St. James’s Hall, London
Joseph Joachim and Clara Schumann. Clara Schumann’s first concert in St. James’s Hall. Ref: SB 2/1, p. 43.

Irish Tour with Jenny Lind Goldschmidt and Otto Goldschmidt

26&28/9/1859: Antient Concert Rooms, Dublin
Madame Lind Goldschmidt with Signor Belletti, Herr Joachim and Mr. Otto Goldschmidt. Ref: CP

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[Dublin Evening Freeman, 30 September, 1859]

 

3/10/1859: 1:00 p.m. Railway Hotel, Killarney
Jenny Lind Goldschmidt, Otto Goldschmidt, Signor Belletti, Joachim. Rondo from Mozart “Il re Pastore,” Andante con Variation from Beethoven Sonata, op. 47, Tartini Sonata (Larghetto — Tempo Giusto — Finale), Mozart duo for violin and piano. Ref: Tralee Chronicle (2 September, 1859).

1860

1861

1862

5/5/1862: St. James’s Hall, London [Ref: BNA]
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November, 1862: Crystal Palace, London
Spohr Violin Concerto in E Minor

1865

17/11/1865: Singakademie, Berlin
Joachim, Hofopernsänger Stägemann, Musikdirektor Radecke. Ref: National-Zeitung, Berlin, vol. 18, no. 535 (15 November, 1865). [Review in National-Zeitung vol. 18, no. 543 (19 November, 1865)]

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22/11/1865: Singakademie, Berlin
Joachim, Clara Schumann. Ref: National-Zeitung, Berlin, vol. 18, no. 547 (22 November, 1865).

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29/11/1865: Singakademie, Berlin
Joachim, Clara Schumann. Ref: National-Zeitung, Berlin, vol. 18, no. 555 (26 November, 1865).

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1866

22/2/1866: Free Trade Hall, Manchester
Mr. Charles Hallé’s Grand Concerts: Vocalist, Madame Lemmens-Sherrington — Solo violin, Herr Joachim — Solo pianoforte and conductor, Mr Charles Hallé, E. de Jong. Ref: AHRC

8/3/1866Free Trade Hall, Manchester
Mr. Charles Hallé’s Grand Concerts: Vocalists Madame Lemmens-Sherrington, Mr Santley — Solo violin, Herr Joachim — Solo pianoforte and conductor, Mr Charles Hallé — Organist, Mr Henry Walker. Ref: AHRC

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Free Trade Hall, Manchester

1867

19/1/1867: Free Trade Hall, Manchester
Instrumentalists, Madame Schumann, Herr Joachim, Herr L. Ries, Mr Zerbini, Signor Piatti — Vocalist, Miss Louisa Pyne. Ref: AHRC

7/2/1867: Free Trade Hall, Manchester
Mr Charles Hallé’s Grand Concerts: Vocalist, Louise Pyne — Solo violin, Herr Joachim — Solo violoncello, Signor Piatti — Solo pianoforte and conductor, Mr. Charles Hallé. Ref: AHRC

7/3/1867: Free Trade Hall, Manchester
Mr Charles Hallé’s Grand Concerts: Vocalist, Madame Lemons-Sherrington — Solo violin, Herr Joachim — Solo pianoforte and conductor, Mr Charles Hallé. Ref: AHRC

16/3/1867: Crystal Palace, London
Beethoven Violin Concerto; Bach, Prelude and Presto; Romanze from Joachim Hungarian concerto, op. 11. Ref: London Evening Standard, Thursday, 28 March, 1867, p. 6.

1868

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St. James’s Hall, London

22/02/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Elena Angele, Ernst Pauer, Henry Lazarus, C. Harper, John Winterbottom, Mr. Reynolds.  Ref: AHRC

24/02/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Vernon Rigby, Clara Schumann.  Ref: AHRC

29/02/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Cecilia Westbrook, Clara Schumann.  Ref: AHRC

02/03/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Charlotte Sainton Dolby, Clara Schumann.  Ref: AHRC

07/03/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Ernst Pauer, Joseph Joachim, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Anna Jewell, Henry Lazarus, Mr. Reynolds, C. Harper, John Winterbottom.  Ref: AHRC

09/03/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Vernon Rigby, Charles Hallé.  Ref: AHRC

14/03/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, C. Harper, Mr. Standen, Alfredo Piatti, Elena Angéle, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

16/03/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Sims Reeves, Arabella Goddard, Mr. Reynolds.  Ref: AHRC

21/03/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Vernon Rigby, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

23/03/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Cecilia Westbrook, Charles Hallé. Ref: AHRC

28/03/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Henry Blagrove, Henry Lazarus, C. Harper, John Winterbottom, Mr. Reynolds, Alfredo Piatti, Elena Angéle, Arabella Goddard.  Ref: AHRC

30/03/1868: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Cecilia Westbrook, Charles Hallé, Sims Reeves, Arabella goddard, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

1869

04/01/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Edith Wynne, Arabella Goddard. Ref: AHRC

11/01/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Annie Edmonds, Ernst Pauer. Ref: AHRC

18/01/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Emily Spiller, Henry Lazarus, Charles Hallé, Adolf Pollitzer, Mr. Watson, J. B. Zerbini, Mr. Aylward, Mr. Reynolds. Ref: AHRC

23/01/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Charlotte Sainton-Dolby, Arabella Goddard. Ref: AHRC

25/01/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Vernon Rigby, Arabella Goddard, Adolf Pollizer, Mr. Watson, J. B. Zerbini, Mr. Aylward, Charles Reynolds. Ref: AHRC

30/01/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Charlotte Sainton-Dolby, Arabella Goddard, Madame Osborne Williams, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

01/02/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Edith Wynne, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

06/02/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Anna Jewell, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

08/02/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Alessandro Pezze, Karl Wallenreiter, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

13/02/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Anna Jewel, Henry Lazarus, Ernst Pauer, John Radcliff, Appollon Barret, Charles Harper, Mr. Reynolds. Ref: AHRC

15/02/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Vernon Rigby, Charles Hallé.  Ref: AHRC

20/02/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Karl Wallenreiter, Charles Hallé. Ref: AHRC

22/02/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Adolf Pollitzer, Mr. Amor, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Guillaume Paque, Alfredo Piatti, Edith Wynne, Clara Schumann, Prosper Sainton, Josef Ludwig, Mr. Reynolds. Ref: AHRC

27/02/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Miss Banks, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

01/03/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Charlotte Sainton Dolby, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

06/03/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Le Jeune, Arthur, Charlotte Sainton Dolby, Charles Hallé, Joseph Joachim, Louis ries, Henry Blagrove, Henry Lazarus, Charles Harper, John Winterbottom, Charles Reynolds, Alfredo Piatti. Ref: AHRC

08/03/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Le Jeune, Arthur, Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Madame Osborne Williams, Charles Hallé, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

13/03/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Prosper Sainton, Alfredo Piatti, Louis Ries, Adolf Pollitzer, Mr. Watson, J. B. Zerbini, Mr. Aylward, Mr. Reynolds, Edith Wynne, Arabella Goddard. Ref: AHRC

15/03/1869: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Henry Blagrove, Alfredo Piatti, Annie Edmonds, Arabella Goddard. Ref: AHRC

31/10/1869Singakademie, Berlin
Inaugural concert of the Joachim Quartet
(Joachim, Ernst Schiever, Heinrich de Ahna, Wilhelm Müller)

1870

29/01/1870: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Blanche Cole, Ernst Pauer. Ref: AHRC

31/01/1870: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfredo Piatti, Blanche Cole. Ref: AHRC

05/02/1870: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Edith Wynne, Charles Hallé. Ref: AHRC

07/02/1870: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfredo Piatti, Natalie Carola, Franklin Taylor.. Ref: AHRC

8/3/1870: Free Trade Hall, Manchester
Pianoforte, Madame Schumann — Violin, Herr Joachim — Vocalist, Miss Edith Wynne. Ref

1871

20/02/1871: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, J. B. Zerbini, Hugo Daubert, Charles Santley, Charles Hallé. Programme mis-bound in volume. Piatti unwell. Ref: AHRC

13/02/1871: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Miss Enriquez, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

27/02/1871: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Edward Howell, Arthur Byron, Clara Schumann. Piatti unwell. Ref: AHRC

06/03/1871: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Franklin Taylor, Joseph Joachim, Alfredo Piatti, William Hayman Cummings, Ludwig Straus, Henry Lazarus, Paquis, Mr. Hutchins, Mr. Reynolds, Alfredo Piatti. Ref: AHRC

8/3/1871: Philharmonic Society, London
Mr Santley and Miss Edith Wynne (vocal) and Herr Joachim (violin), including a number of words by Gounod being given for the first time. Ref: AHRC

18/03/1871: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfredo Piatti, Rebecca Jewell, Clara Schumann.. Ref: AHRC

20/03/1871: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Mr. Paquis, Mr. Standen, Mr. Reynolds, Alfredo Piatti, Amalie Joachim, Emma Brandes. Ref: AHRC

25/03/1871: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Amalie Joachim, Clara Schumann, Julius Benedict. Ref: AHRC

27/03/1871: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfredo Piatti, Charles Santley, Arabella Goddard. Ref: AHRC

01/04/1871: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Sims Reeves, Emma Brandes, Clara Schumann, Mr. Reynolds, Julius Benedict. Ref: AHRC

03/04/1871: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfredo Piatti, Charles Santley, Amalie Joachim, Clara Schumann, Ernst Pauer, Wilma Norman Neruda, Charles Hallé, Mr. Reynolds, Julius Benedict. Ref: AHRC

1872

22/2/1872: Free Trade Hall, Manchester
Mr Charles Hallé’s Grand Concerts: Vocalists, Miss Helen D’alton, Mr Maybrick — Solo violin, Herr Joachim — Solo pianoforte and conductor, Mr Charles Hallé. Ref

27/2/1872: Royal Albert Hall, London
Grand Evening Concert on Thanksgiving Day, with Mr Cummings, Mr Maybrick, Mr Sims Reeves, Mademoiselle Enriquez, Mademoiselle J. Sherrington and Madame Lemmens Sherrington (vocal), Joseph Joachim (violin) and Mr G. Carter (organ), conducted by Sir Julius Benedict, including the first performance of Julius Benedict, Hymn of Thanksgiving. Ref: AHRC

1873

1874

14/02/1874: Crystal Palace, London
Elena Corani, Signor Agnesi, Joseph Joachim, Mr. Wedemeyer. Ref: AHRC

1875

10/01/1875: Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, Vienna:

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Photo: Brahms Institut Lübeck

13/03/1875: Crystal Palace, London
Edith Wynne, Helene Arnim, Joseph Joachim, August Manns. Ref: AHRC

18/3/1875: Philharmonic Society, London
Miss Edith Wynne, Madame Patey, Mr W. H. Cummings and Mr Santley (vocal) and Herr Joachim (violin), including the first performance of W. Sterndale Bennett, Funeral March from Music of Sophocles. Ref: AHRC

1876

04/03/1876: Crystal Palace, London
Wilhelmine Gips, George E. Fox, Joseph Joachim, August Manns. First performance of Joachim’s orchestration of Schubert’s Grand Duo for piano, D812. Ref: AHRC

7/3/1876: Cambridge University Musical Society, Cambridge
Concert including Haydn, String Quartet in G, op.76/1 and Schumann, Piano Quintet in E flat, op.44, given by J. Joachim, Rev. F. Hudson, Mr Burnett and Rev. T.P. Hudson. Also, Mr G.F. Cobb and F. Pownall (vocal) and C.V. Stanford (piano).

18/03/1876: Crystal Palace, London
Thekla Friedländer, Annie Butterworth, Jospeh Joachim, August Manns. First performance in England of Rubinstein’s Ballet music and Wedding march from Feramors. Ref: AHRC

1877

03/02/1877: Crystal Palace, London
Edward Lloyd, Crystal Palace Choir, Joseph Joachim, August Manns. Concert to mark the 30th anniversary of Mendelssohn’s death. Ref: AHRC

8/3/1877: Cambridge University Musical Society, Cambridge
Concert in aid of Addenbrooke’s Hospital, including Brahms, Song of Destiny and Symphony in C minor, the latter receiving its first performance in England. Also, Beethoven, Violin Concerto (Joachim, violin) and the first performance of Joachim, Elegiac Overture in Commemoration of Kleist (composed especially for the concert) (with historical and analytical notes the Brahms symphony and the Joachim Overture and a historical note, by Stanford, on CUMS). Ref: CP

12/03/1877: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, J. B. Zerbini, Alessandro Pezze, Alfredo Piatti, Sophie Löwe, Clara Schumann. Ref: AHRC

1878

27/2/1878: Cambridge University Musical Society, Cambridge
Concert including Beethoven String Quartets op.95 and 130 (Messrs Joachim, Ries, Straus and Piatti) and a vocal quartet (‘Spring Time’) by the same composer (Rev. L. Borissow, Messrs C.A. Treherne, G.F. Cobb and A.H. Mann). Also, solo violin pieces by Joachim and Brahms (Joachim, violin), a duet for cello and piano by Schumann, and a glee by Spofforth (with historical and descriptive notes and advertisements for the Popular Concert series and for the Easter Term performances). Bound with program is an insert detailing the necessary replacement of certain performers, including Piatti by Mr Daubert. Ref: CP

28/12/1878: Berlin
Viotti Concerto a minor, Joachim “Hungarian” concerto, op. 11. Ref: NZfM (2/1/1879)

1879

JJ portrait

1/1/1879: Gewandhaus, Leipzig
First Performance of Brahms violin concerto, Beethoven violin concerto, Brahms violin concerto, Bach chaconne. Ref: NZfM (17/1/1879).

8/1/1879: Budapest
Johannes Brahms conducting, Johannes Brahms violin concerto. Ref: Wolfgang Ebert, “Johannes Brahms in Ungarn,” Studien zur Musikwissenschaft, vol. 37 (1986) p. 110. (With review)

18/1/1879: Convictsaal, Prague
Ref: PT

18/2/1879: St James’s Hall, London
Grand Orchestral and Vocal Concerts with Miss Emma Beasley (vocal) and Herr Joachim (violin), including the first English performance of Baron Orezy, Hungarian Ballet Music from the opera, The Renegade (conducted by the composer). Ref: AHRC

22/02/1879: Crystal Palace, London
Joseph Joachim, Anne Marriott, Charles Santley, August Manns. First British performance of Brahms violin concerto. Ref: AHRC

8/3/1879: Joseph Joachim, Anne Marriott, Charles Santley, August Manns. First British performance of Brahms violin concerto. Ref: AHRC

13/3/1879: Cambridge University Musical Society, Cambridge
Concert including Schumann, Quartet in A minor, op.41/1 and Beethoven Quartet in C sharp minor, op.131, with Messrs Joachim, Ries, Zerbini and Piatti. Also, violin solos by Viotti and Joachim/Brahms, a cello and piano duet by Schumann (op.102) and songs by Brahms and Stanford, given by Mr Herbert E. Thorndike (vocal) and C.V. Stanford (piano) (with historical and descriptive notes on the Beethoven quartet, by ‘E.S.T.’).

20/3/1879: St James’s Hall, London
Philharmonic Society, W. G. Cusins, cond. Brahms violin concerto. Ref: Program (Schubertiade sale).

Screen shot 2014-11-11 at 9.58.35 AM

12-26/9/1879: Concert tour with Johannes Brahms through Transylvania. Brahms violin concerto, works of Spohr, Bach, Schumann, Gluck and Schubert; Romanze from Joachim Hungarian concerto, op. 11; Brahms Cappricios, op. 73; Beethoven Kreutzer sonata. Ref: Renate and Kurt Hofmann, p. 146.

13/9/1879: Piano salon Pirnitzer, Budapest
Concert with Johannes Brahms.

15/9/1879: Timișoara
Concert with Johannes Brahms.

19/9/1879: Kronstadt
Concert with Johannes Brahms.

21/9/1879: Hermannstadt
Concert with Johannes Brahms.

23/9/1879: Klausenburg
Concert with Johannes Brahms.

26/12/1879-15/2/1880: Concertizing in Austria-Hungary. Ref: PT

1880

6/1/1880: Milan
Joachim and Bonawitz (piano), Joachim Hungarian Concerto, Hungarian Dances. Ref: Musical Times (1 February, 1880), p. 85.

30/1/1880: Budapest
Brahms violin concerto. Ref: Wolfgang Ebert, “Johannes Brahms in Ungarn,” Studien zur Musikwissenschaft, vol. 37 (1986) p. 111. (With review)

11/2/1880Sophieninselsaal, Prague
5:00 p.m. Recital with Johannes Brahms; Spohr Gesangsscene, 2 Rhapsodies of Brahms (Brahms), Bach Chaconne, Brahms sonata (unspecified), Hiller Adagio, Spohr Barcarolle, Paganini Caprice, Brahms-Joachim “Dva uherské tauce.” Ref: Prager Tagblatt, 11 February 1880.

28/2/1880Crystal Palace, London
Spohr Concerto no. 12 in A, op. 79, Joachim Theme and Variations WoO in E minor first performance.
August Manns, conductor. Ref: program, Crystal Palace, London, 28 February 1880

18/3/1880: St James’s Hall, London
Philharmonic Society (W. G. Cusins, cond.), Brahms Violin Concerto. Ref: Morning Post (16 March, 1880), p. 1.

1881

22/2/1881: Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Max Bruch, Liverpool
Bruch Scottish Fantasy Op.46 (UK premiere), Soloist Joseph Joachim
Ref: Christopher Fifield: Max Bruch: His Life and Works

2/4/1881: Crystal Palace, London
Spohr Adagio and Allegro (Concerto no. 6), Joachim Variations WoO E minor. Ref: Program, Crystal Palace Saturday Concert 2 April 1881

The Scottish Fantasy was dedicated to Sarasate. Bruch felt that Joachim played poorly, and wrote “He calls Sarasate a clown, and makes fun of our relationship. It was exactly Joachim’s untrustworthiness and partisanship which drove me directly into Sarasate’s arms. Sarasate cares about modern works, because he has respect for them … Joachim takes no interest in them (apart from Brahms’ works), and plays them half-heartedly, and with inadequate technique, doing them more harm than good.” Christopher Fifield, Max Bruch: His Life and Works (London: Victor Gollancz, 1988; repr. Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2005), pp. 168–9.

7/2/1881: Cambridge University Musical Society
(C. V. Stanford, cond.): Stanford “Elegiac” Symphony, Brahms violin concerto, Joachim violin variations e minor. Ref: Musical Times (1/4/1882); Bury and Norwich Post (14/3/1882).

10/3/1881: Cambridge University Musical Society
Beethoven, String Quartet in F Major, op.35 and Brahms, String Quartet in A minor, op.51/2 (Messrs Joachim, Gompertz, Ludwig and Hausmann). Also, Beethoven, Violin Sonata in G Major, op.26, Schumann, Märchenbilder for Cello and Piano, op.113 and a violin solo by Brahms-Joachim. Stanford and Miss Arnold (piano) (Program with brief historical notes). Ref: CP

11/11/1881 Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, de Ahna, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend; Schumann Quartet F Major, op. 40, Cherubini Quartet d minor, Beethoven Quartet C sharp minor, op. 131. Ref: JJC

14/11/1881: Cambridge University Musical Society
Brahms, Piano Quartet in G minor, op.26 (Messrs Stanford, Gompertz, Donkin and Whitehouse) and Beethoven, Serenade, Trio for Violin, Viola and Violoncello, op.8. Also, violin solos by Joachim and Sarasate (Gompertz), a cello solo by Boccherini (Whitehouse) and songs by Pergolesi, Scarlatti, Parry and Stanford (Mr Thorndike). Ref: CP

26/11/1881 Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Gewandhaus Orchestra, Mozart Sinfonia Concertante (Engelbert Röntgen, viola), Mendelssohn Violin Concerto. Ref: AMZ (30/11/1881) p. 766.

1882

7/2/1881: Cambridge University Musical Society
(C. V. Stanford, cond.): Stanford “Elegiac” Symphony, Brahms violin concerto, Joachim violin variations e minor. Ref: Musical Times (1/4/1882); Bury and Norwich Post (14/3/1882).

23/2/1882: Hallé’s Concert, Manchester
Brahms violin concerto, Joachim violin variations e minor. Ref: Musical Times (1/4/1882); London Standard (27/3/1882).

27/02/1882: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Gustav Hollander, Alfredo Piatti, Agnes Zimmermann, Mr. Abercrombie. Ref: AHRC

7/3/1882: Cambridge University Musical Society, Cambridge
Concert including the first public performance of C.V. Stanford, Symphony (MS) in D minor ‘Elegiac’. Also, Beethoven, Overture ‘Coriolanus’, Wagner, Siegfried Idyll and concertante music for violin by Brahms and Joachim (Joachim, violin) (with brief historical notes). Ref: CP

18/03/1882: Crystal Palace London
Mrs Hutchinson, Miss Hope Glenn, Jospeh Joachim, August Manns. Brahms Violin Concerto, Joachim “Elegiac” Overture, op. 13. Ref: AHRC, Musical Times (1/4/1882):

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26/12/1882Glasgow Choral Union. Ref: AHRC

1883

4/2/1883: Seventh Concert of the Musikgesellschaft, Basel
Mendelssohn a minor Symphony, Brahms Violin Concerto (first Swiss performance), Ouverture by Joachim (unspecified), Adagio by Viotti, Brahms-Joachim Hungarian Dances, Weber Freischütz Ouverture. Ref: Neue Zeitschrift für Musik, vol. 50, no. 7 (9 February, 1883). p. 79.

10/03/1883: Crystal Palace, London
Joseph Joachim, Herr Krause, August Manns. Ref: AHRC

04/12/1882: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfredo Piatti, Carlotta Elliot, Dora Schirmacher, Adolf Pollizer, J. B. Zerbini, Mr,. Wiener, Alessandro Pezze. Ref: AHRC

1884

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25/02/1884: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Gustav Hollander, J. B. Zerbini, Alessandro Pezze, Alfredo Piatti, Agnes Zimmermann, Edith Santley. Ref: AHRC

03/03/1884: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Gustav Hollander, Alfredo Piatti, Clara Schumann, Miss Badia. Ref: AHRC

15/3/1884: Crystal Palace, London
Joachim, Manns (cond.), Mozart violin concerto in A Major, Joachim Variations for violin and orchestra. Ref: The South London Press, 22 March 1884: “This great Hungarian violinist introduced for the first time to an English audience a concerto by Mozart, in A Major, for violin and orchestra. The concerto was composed in 1775, at Salzburg, where Joachim discovered it some 25 years back, made a copy of it, and played it in Hanover. […] Herr Joachim later in the afternoon gave one of his compositions, ‘Variations for violin and orchestra,’ during which one of his violin strings broke, which accident was, however, soon remedied.”

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22/03/1884: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, J. B. Zerbini, Alfredo Piatti, Clara Schumann, Raimund von Zur Mühlen. Ref: AHRC

13/12/1884: Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Drittes Fest-Concert zur Einweihung des neuen Gewandhauses zu Leipzig
Mozart, Concerto no. 5 in A Major; Spohr, Adagio from Concerto no. 6 (op. 28)

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Images courtesy Ute Blumeyer
BRAHMSGESELLSCHAFT BADEN-BADEN e.V.

1885

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28/02/1885: Crystal Palace, London
Harper Kearton, Joseph Joachim, Robert Heckmann, Alfred Eyre, Crystal Palace Choir, August Manns. Ref: AHRC

13/03/1885: Guildhall, Cambridge
Cambridge University Musical Society. Joachim, “Hungarian” concerto; Bach, Prelude and Fugue in G minor; Beethoven Namensfeier Overture; Stanford, Elegaic Ode; Mozart, Symphony in D. Ref: Cambridge Chronicle and University Journal (6 March, 1885); CP

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14/03/1885: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday Popular Concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfredo Piatti, Edward Lloyd, Fanny Frickenhaus, Sidney Naylor, Charles Ould. Ref: AHRC

6/11/1885: Philharmonic Hall, Berlin
Mendelssohn-Feier, Stern’scher Gesang-Verein (Rudorff), All-Mendelssohn Program: 114 Psalm, op. 51, Violin Concerto, op. 64 (Joachim), Die erste Walpurgisnacht, op. 60. Ref: JJC

1886

15/3/1886: St. James’s Hall, London
Monday Popular Concerts. Joseph Joachim, Wilhelmine Norman-Neruda, Bach Concerto for Two Violins (accompanied on the piano by Miss Agnes Zimmermann); Mendelssohn Quintet in B flat for two Violins, two Violas, and Violoncello, Joachim, Norman-Neruda, Straus, Gibson, and Piatti. Ref: Program.

19/3/1886: Cambridge University Musical Society
Concert including Beethoven Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, given by J. Joachim (with historical and analytical notes by George Grove. Ref: CP

22/3/1886: St. James’s Hall, London
Monday Popular Concerts.
Joachim, Ries, Straus, and Piatti, Beethoven Quartet in C sharp Minor, O. 132; Bach Chaconne; Beethoven Trio in G Major, Fanny Davies, Joachim, Piatti. Ref: Program.

1887

16/2/1887: St. James’s Hall, London,
London Symphony Concerts.
Brahms violin concerto, Beethoven Romanze in F. Ref: The Graphic (5 March, 1887), p. 238; London Standard (16 February, 1887), p. 2.

24/2/1887St. James’s Hall, London
London Symphony Concerts.
Brahms violin concerto, Beethoven Romanze in F. Ref: Morning Post (23 February, 1887) p. 1.

19/03/1887: Crystal Palace, London
Adelaide Mullen, Joseph Joachim, August Manns. First performance in England of Widor’s Symphony no. 2 in A, op. 54. Ref: AHRC

1/11/1887Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, de Ahna, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend; Schumann Quartet a minor, op. 41, Bargiel Quartet E flat Major, op. 74, Beethoven Quartet E flat Major, op. 74. Ref: JJC

15/11/1887: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Recital with Fanny Davies. Beethoven Sonata in E-flat, Bach Chaconne, Brahms Sonata in A Major. Ref: Program.

1888

15/02/1888: London
George Henschel, Joseph Bennett, Joseph Joachim, Robert Hausmann. Henschel’s London symphony Concerts, Programme notes by Joseph Bennett. First performance in England of Brahms double concerto. Programme belonging to E. L. Jenkinson. Ref: AHRC

5/3/1888: Crystal Palace, London
London Standard review of Crystal Palace Saturday Concerts
Bach Concerto for Two Violins (with Geraldine Morgan), Brahms violin concerto. “Dr. Joachim rendered the performance of Brahms’ Concerto for Violin and Orchestra incomparably beautiful, and the applause at its close was tumultuous. This is the third time Dr. Joachim has played this concerto here, the first being in February, 1879, and the second in March, 1882.” Ref: London Standard (5 March, 1888). [Joachim also played a Sarabande and Bourée by Bach] Review

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23-25/6/1888: Stuttgart Musikfest
Brahms Violin Concerto in D Major, op. 77. Ref: SB 2/2, p. 1340 n. 4.

26/11/1888: Berlin, Berlin Philharmonic
Hans von Bülow, cond. Joachim Violin Concerto No. 3, Schumann Fantasie, op. 131.

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1889

23/1/1889: Große Saal, Berlin
Berlin Philharmonic, Woldemar Bargiel, cond. Concert of Clara Schumann and Joseph Joachim. This was the last time Joachim and Clara Schumann appeared together. For the preparations, see: SB 2/2 p. 1361 ff. Program:
Schumann Fantasy, Joachim Hungarian Concerto (Clara Schumann played Chopin, Concerto No. 2 in F Minor). Ref: ALP

 

Rudolfinum, Prague

29/1/1889: Rudolfinum, Prague
Recital with Carl Heinrich Barth, piano.

11/2/1889: Grosser Musikvereinssaal, Vienna
K.k. Hofopernorchester, Hans Richter, cond., Beethoven violin concerto, Spohr Adagio, Schumann Abendlied (orch. Joachim), Brahms violin concerto. Ref: Program RWE

22/2/1889: Grosser Musikvereinssaal, Vienna
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Hans Richter, cond., Joseph Joachim “Hungarian” Violin Concerto, Hugo Reinhold Intermezzo scherzoso für Orchester, Robert Schumann Fantasie für Violine, op. 131, Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Concerto for Violin in E minor, op. 64.  Ref: VPO

19/3/1889 Cambridge University Musical Society
Program and wordbook for various solo and ensemble vocal pieces sung during a dinner held by the Cambridge University Musical Society in honor of Dr Joachim. The program includes a seating plan listing all those in attendance, including George Grove and C.V. Stanford. Ref: CP

1890

22/02/1890: St James’s Hall: Saturday popular concerts
Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfredo Piatti, Lilian Henschel, Agnes Zimmermann. Ref: AHRC

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Image © Copyright Universitätsbibliothek Frankfurt, Bockenheimer Landstr. 134-138, D-60325 Frankfurt a.M.

08/03/1890: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfredo Piatti, Reginald Groome, Caroline Geisler-Schubert, Mary Carmichael. Ref: AHRC

15/3/1890: Crystal Palace, London
15 March: Miss Alice Whitacre (vocal), Joseph Joachim (violin) and Ernest Gillet (cello) Brahms Concerto for Violin and Violoncello, Bach Chaconne. Ref: AHRC, STRAD

26/3/1890: Kinnaird Hall, Dundee
Joachim, Piatti, Davies, Spohr Adagio in e minor from the 11th concerto, two Brahms/Joachim Hungarian Dances. Ref: Dundee Advertiser (17 March, 1890), p. 5.

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Joseph Joachim, Heinrich de Ahna, Emanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann

Royal Academy of Music, Museum & Collections, 2004.1969, bequeathed by Norman McCann, 1999.

1891

10/01/1891:  Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, de Ahna, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (II Cyclus); Beethoven Quartet A Major, op. 18, Beethoven Quartet F Minor, op. 95, Beethoven Quartet C Sharp Minor, op. 131. Ref: Program

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09/02/1891: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Fanny Davies, Joseph Joachim, Franz Friedrich Paersch, Bertha Moore, Ludwig Straus, Julian Egerton, William Wotton, Mr. Reynolds. Ref: AHRC

14/02/1891: St James’s Hall, London
Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfred Gibson, Alfredo Piatti, Orlando Harley, Max Pauer, Oliver King. Ref: AHRC

21/02/1891: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfred Gibson, W. E. Whitehouse, Alfredo Piatti. Braxton Smith, Agnes Zimmermann. Saturday popular concerts. Ref: AHRC

07/03/1891: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, Ludwig Straus, Alfred Gibson, Alfredo Piatti, Charles Santley, Fanny Davies, Sideny Naylor. Ref: AHRC

6/10 – 9/10/1891: Prospectus for 1891 Birmingham Musical Festival at the Town Hall. Performers: Emma Albani, Anna Williams, Edward Lloyd, Charles Santley, Mr Brereton, Mrs Brereton, Miss Macintyre, Hilda Wilson, Madame Hope Glenn, Iver McKay, Watkin Mills, George Henschel, Joseph Joachim, Hans Richter. Ref: AHRC

14/10/1891Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, de Ahna, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet B Major (49 in the Peters Edition), Mozart Quartet D Major, No. 10, Beethoven Quartet E flat Major, op. 127. Ref: JJC

28/10/1891Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, de Ahna, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (I Cyclus); Bargiel Quartet d minor, op. 47, Schubert Quartet a minor, op. 29, Beethoven Quartet C Major, op. 59. Ref: JJC

9/11/1891: Berlin Concert Direction Hermann Wolf: REF

5/12/1891Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Mozart-Feier, Concert celebrating the 100th anniversary of Mozart’s Death, for the benefit of a monument for Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven in Berlin, Mozart Violin Concerto A Major. Ref: JJC

12/12/1891: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Richard Mühlfeld, Joachim Quartet (Joachim, de Ahna, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (I Cyclus); Brahms Trio a minor for Piano, Clarinet and Violoncello (Mscrpt.), Mozart Quartet G Major, Brahms Quintet B minor for Clarinet, two violins, viola and violoncello (Mscrpt.). Ref: JJC

29/12/1981: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, de Ahna, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (I Cyclus); All Beethoven Program, Quartet F major, op. 18, Quartet E flat Major, op 74, Quartet A Minor, op 132. Ref: JJC

1892

3/2/1892: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, de Ahna, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn Quartet D Major, op. 50 (No. 27 in the Peters Edition), Cherubini Quartet D Minor, Beethoven Quartet E Minor, op. 59, no. 2. Ref: JJC

16/2/1892: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, de Ahna, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (II Cyclus); Herzogenberg Quartet G Major, op. 42, Beethoven Quartet F Minor, op. 95, Schubert Quartet D Minor. Ref: JJC

12/3/1892Crystal Palace, London
Madame Hope Glenn (vocal) and Joseph Joachim. Ref: AHRC

24/5/1892: Hoftheater, Weimar:

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15/10/1892: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse (for the ill de Ahna), Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet E flat Major, op. 64, Mozart Quartet D Minor, Beethoven Quartet B Major, op. 130. Ref: JJC

29/10/1892: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, de Ahna, Wirth, Hausmann), Bram Eldering, 2nd viola, 2. Abend (I Cyclus); Beethoven Quartet B Major, op. 18, Herzogenberg Quintet C Minor, op. 77, Schumann Quartet A Major, op. 41. Ref: JJC

14/12/1892: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), H. Dechert, 2nd violoncello, 3. Abend (I Cyclus); Mendelssohn Quartet E flat Major, op. 12, Haydn Quartet B Minor, Schubert Quintet C Major, op. 163.  “Zur Erinnerung an Heinrich de Ahna, gest. am 1. November 1892” Ref: JJC

29/12/1892: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (I Cyclus); Prinz Reuss Quartet F Major, Mozart Quartet D Major, no. 7, Beethoven Quartet E flat Major, op. 127. Ref: JJC

1893 

1/1/1893: Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Mozart A major Concerto; Schumann Gartenmelodie, Gade Caprice in A Minor (Reinecke ed.), Bach, Bourée and Double from the solo sonata in B Minor. Ref: Signale

14/1/1893: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (II Cyclus); All Beethoven Program: Quartet A Major, op. 18, Quartet F Minor, op. 95, Quartet C sharp Minor, op. 131. Ref: JJC

28/1/1893: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), Bram Eldering, 2nd viola, 2. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn Quartet D Minor, op. 76, Mozart Divertimento E flat Major for Violin, Viola and Violoncello, Brahms Quintet G Major, op. 111. Ref: JJC

9/2/1893: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (II Cyclus); Cherubini Quartet E flat Major, Schumann Quartet A Minor, op. 41, Beethoven Quartet E flat Major, op 74. Ref: JJC

12/4/1893: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (II Cyclus); Mozart Quartet B Major, no. 9, d’Albert Quartet II E flat Major, op. 11 (neu), Beethoven Quartet E Minor, op. 59, no. 2. Ref: JJC

14/10/1893: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), Bram Eldering, 2nd viola, 1. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet F Major, op. 77, Beethoven Quartet F Minor, op. 95, Mozart Quintet G Minor. Ref: JJC

1894

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31/1/1894Scottish Orchestra Company, Popular Orchestral Concerts
Beethoven violin concerto. Ref: AHRC , Dundee Evening Telegraph (1/2/1894).

14/4/1894:

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13/10/1894: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet C Major, Mozart Quartet G Major, Beethoven Quartet E Minor, op. 59, no. 2. Ref: JJC

27/10/1894: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (I Cyclus); Beethoven Quartet C Minor, op. 18, Brahms Quartet B Major, op. 67, Schubert Quartet C Major, op. 163,  Ref: JJC

13/12/1894: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), Schrattenholz, 2nd violoncello, 3. Abend (I Cyclus); Klughardt Quintet for 2 violins, viola and 2 violoncelli G Minor, op. 62 (neu), Mozart Quartet E flat Major, Brahms Sextet B Major, op. 18. Ref: JJC

14/12/1894: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Gedächtnisfeier für Hermann von Helmholtz / Memorial Concert for Hermann von Helmholtz, Schumann Abendlied. Ref: JJC

28/12/1894: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (II Cyclus); All-Beethoven Program: Quartet A Major, op. 18, Quartet C Major, op. 59, Quartet A Minor, op. 132. Ref: JJC

1895

12/1/1895: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn Quartet G Major, op. 77, Dvorák Quartet E flat Major, op. 51, Beethoven Quartet F Minor, op. 95. Ref: JJC

24/1/1895: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), Andreas Moser, 2nd viola, 3. Abend (II Cyclus); Mozart Quintet D Major, Cherubini Quartet E flat Major, Brahms Quintet G Major, op. 111. Ref: JJC

30/03/1895: Crystal Palace, London
Agnes Janson, Joseph Joachim, Emily Shinner, Sir Arthur Sullivan. Ref: AHRC

27/4/1895: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn Quartet C Major, op. 54, no. 2, Mozart Quartet F Major, Beethoven Quartet C sharp Minor, op. 131. Ref: JJC

12/10/1895: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet G Major, Mozart Quartet A Major, Beethoven Quartet B Major, op. 130. Ref: JJC

26/10/1895: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (I Cyclus); Mozart Quartet D Minor, Dvorák Quartet C Major, op 61, Beethoven Quartet E flat Major, op. 127. Ref: JJC

11/12/1895: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), Dechert, 2nd violoncello, 3. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet F Major (no. 14 in the Peters Edition), Brahms Quartet A Minor, op. 51, Schubert Quintet C Major, op. 163. Ref: JJC

28/12/1895: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir (for Kruse), Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (I Cyclus); All-Beethoven Program: Quartet E-flat Major, op. 74, Quartet G Major, op. 18, Quartet C sharp Minor, op. 131. Ref: JJC

1896

The_Year’s_Music 1896

11/1/1896: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), Moser, 2nd viola, Dechert, 2nd violoncello, 1. Abend (II Cyclus); Mozart Quartet D Major, no. 10, Brahms Sextet G Major, op. 36, Beethoven Quartet E Minor, op. 59. Ref: JJC

22/1/1896: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn Quartet B Major, op. 76, H. von Herzogenberg Quartet F Minor, op. 63, Beethoven Quintet C Major, op. 29 (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola). Ref: JJC

1/2/1896: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (II Cyclus); Mendelssohn Quartet e minor, op. 44, no. 2, Beethoven Quartet A Major, op. 18, Schubert Quartet D Minor. Ref: JJC

07/03/1896: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Louis Ries, George A. Clinton, Paul Ludwig, Ada Crossley, Gospodin Sapellnikoff, Henry Bird.  Ref: AHRC

15/4/1896: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn Quartet B Minor, no. 32 in Peters Edition, Mozart Quartet B Major, no. 9, Beethoven Quartet A Minor, op. 132. Ref: JJC

7/5/1896: Philharmonic Hall, Berlin
Jubelfeier des 200jährigen Bestehens, Königliche Akademie der Künste zu Berlin. Spitta/Bruch Moses, op. 67 (Joachim, cond.). Ref: JJC

10/10/1896: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet B Major, op. 64, Mozart Quartet E flat Major, Beethoven Quartet F Major, op. 59. Ref: JJC

28/10/1896: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (I Cyclus); Beethoven Quartet B Major, op. 18, Schubert Quartet G Major, op. 161, Brahms Quintet F Major, op. 88 (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola).  Ref: JJC

13/12/1896: Saale des Saalbaues, Frankfurt

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1897

24/1/1897: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (II Cyclus); All-Beethoven Concert: Quartet D Major, op. 18, Quartet f minor, op. 95, Quartet F Major, op. 135. Ref: JJC

2/2/1897: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn Quartet B Major, op. 71, no. 1, Brahms Quartet A Minor, op. 51, Schubert Quartet D Minor. Ref: JJC

17/2/1897: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (II Cyclus); Mendelssohn Quartet E flat Major, op. 12, Beethoven Quartet A Minor, op. 132, Mozart Quintet G Minor (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola). Ref: JJC

22/4/1897: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Kruse, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (II Cyclus); Johannes Brahms zum Gedächtniss/Johannes Brahms Memorial Concert: Quartet C Minor, op. 51, Sextet B Major, op. 18, Quintet G Major, op. 111 (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola; Hugo Dechert, 2nd violoncello). Ref: JJC

16/10/1897: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet C Major, Mozart Quartet D Minor, Beethoven Quartet C sharp Minor, op. 131. Ref: JJC

31/10/1897: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (I Cyclus); Schumann Quartet F Major, op. 41, Stanford Quartet D Minor, op. 64, Beethoven Quartet E Minor, op. 59. Ref: JJC

24/11/1897: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet G Minor, op. 74, Brahms Quartet B Major, op. 67 (“Herrn Prof. Engelmann gewidmet”), Beethoven Quartet E flat Major, op. 74. Ref: JJC

8/12/1897: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (I Cyclus); Mozart Quartet G Major, Mendelssohn Quintet B Major, op. 87 (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola), Beethoven Quartet E flat Major, op. 127. Ref: JJC

1898

JoachimQuartet

The_Year’s_Music 1898

 

21/03/1898: St James’s Hall, London
Saturday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Johann Secundus Kruse, Emanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann, Beatrice Spencer, Henry Bird. Ref: AHRC

28/03/1898: St James’s Hall, London
Monday popular concerts. Joseph Joachim, Johann Secundus Kruse, Emanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann, Lilian Henschel, Henry Bird, Ref: AHRC

1899

28/2/1899 Town Hall, Birmingham
Mr. Halford’s Orchestral Concerts. Ref: AHRC

1901

25/4 – 10/5 1901: Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann. Handbill for Joachim Quartet concerts 1901. Ref: AHRC

27/04/1901: Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann, Alfred Hobday, Percy Such. Second Joachim Quartet concert. Ref: AHRC

4/5/1901: Queen’s Hall (afternoon), London
Harold Bauer (piano, first appearance at Queen’s Hall) and Dr. Joachim (violin), conducted by Henry J. Wood. Ref: AHRC, AHRC(2)

9/5 – 23/5 1901: Donald Francis Tovey. Handbill for three recitals. Ref: AHRC

1902

JJ Schönknecht 11 Dec 1902

26/4 – 15/5 1902: Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann, Handbill for Joachim Quartet concerts 1902. Ref: AHRC

26/04/1902: Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann. First Joachim Quartet concert 1902. Ref: AHRC

28/04/1902: Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann. Second Joachim Quartet concert 1902. Ref: AHRC

08/05/1902: Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann, Alfred Gibson. Fifth Joachim Quartet concert 1902. Ref: AHRC

03/11/1902: Konzertsaal der Hochschule für Musik, Berlin
G. F. Handel, Messiah, Joseph Joachim, conductor. Ref: Chronik der Königlichen Akademie der Künste (1903), 53.

1903

00168556

20/1/1903: Meininger Hofkapelle (Steinbach), Marburg

Possart JJ Quartet

25/4 – 14/5 1903: St. James’s Hall, London
Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann. Handbill for Joachim Quartet concerts 1903. Ref: AHRC

1/5/1903

joachim committee copy 6

5-14/5/1903

17/5 – 21/5 1903: Beethoven Chamber Music Festival, Bonn.

9 copy

Image © Copyright Universitätsbibliothek Frankfurt, Bockenheimer Landstr. 134-138, D-60325 Frankfurt a.M.

1904

Schmutzer Joachim Quartet

23/4 – 12/5 1904: Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann. Handbill for Joachim Quartet concerts 1904. Ref: AHRC

25/04/1904: Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann. Second Joachim Quartet concert 1904. Ref: AHRC

02/05/1904: Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann. Fourth Joachim Quartet concert 1904. Ref: AHRC

09/05/1904: Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Emmanuel Wirth, Robert Hausmann. Sixth Joachim Quartet concert 1904. Ref: AHRC

NPG D36522; Joseph Joachim published by Berlin Photographic Co, after John Singer Sargent

13/10/1904: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (I Cyclus); Mozart Quartet B Major, no. 3, Haydn Quartet F Minor(Peters no. 47), Beethoven Quartet B Major, op. 130. Ref: JJC

24/11/1904: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet C Major, op. 54, no. 2, Brahms Quartet B Major, op. 67, Beethoven Quartet E Minor, op. 59, no. 2. Ref: JJC

29/12/1904: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (I Cyclus); Schubert Quartet A Minor, op. 29, Beethoven Quartet B Major, op. 18, no. 6, Brahms Quintet no. 2 G Major, op. 111 (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola). Ref: JJC

1905

12/1/1905: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (II Cyclus); All-Beethoven Program: Quartet A Major, op. 18, no. 5, Quartet F Minor, op. 95, Quartet E flat Major, op. 127. Ref: JJC

28/2/1905: (Berlin Cathedral)
Geistliches Konzert für die Frauenhilfe, Emmy Dessin, Marie Götze, Joseph Joachim, Kawerau and H. Prüfer (conds.), Königl. Hof- und Domchor, members of the Königl. Kapelle and Königl. Hochschule für Musik. Joachim: J. S. Bach Concerto A Minor, Beethoven Romanze G Major, op. 40. Ref: JJC

2/3/1905: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn Quartet B Major, op. 76, L. 2, Mendelssohn Quartet E Minor, op. 44, Beethoven Quartet A Minor, op. 132. Ref: JJC

6/4/1905: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (II Cyclus); Beethoven Quartet C Minor, op. 18, no. 4, Mozart Quintet E flat Major, Brahms Sextet no. 2, G Major, op. 36 (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola; Hugo Dechert, 2nd violoncello) Ref: JJC

10/4/1905: Philharmonic Hall, Berlin
Concert zum Besten des Pensionsfonds des Berliner Philharmonischen Orchesters, (Nikisch, cond.), All-Beethoven Concert: Leonore Overture no. 2, Triple Concerto, op. 56 (Joachim, Hausmann, Georg Schumann), Symphony no. 3 in E flat Major, op. 55 (Eroica). Ref: JJC

12/10/1905: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet G Major, op. 17, Mozart Quartet D Minor, Beethoven Quartet E flat Major, op. 74. Ref: JJC

9/11/1905: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet G Minor, op. 74, no. 3, Brahms Quartet A Minor, op. 51, no. 2, Beethoven Quintet C Major, op. 29 (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola). Ref: JJC

30/11/1905: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (I Cyclus); Schumann Quartet A Major, op. 41, no. 3, Mozart Quartet B Major (Peters No. 9), Beethoven Quartet C sharp Minor, op. 131. Ref: JJC

28/12/1905: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (I Cyclus); Beethoven Quartet D Major, op. 18, no. 3, Brahms Quartet C Minor, op. 51, no. 1, Schubert Quintet C Major, op. 163 (Hugo Dechert, 2nd violoncello). Ref: JJC

1906

1/2/1906: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (II Cyclus); All-Mozart Program: Quartet A Major, Trio (Divertimento) E flat Major, Quintet C Major (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola). Ref: JJC

1/3/1906: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn, Quartet F Major, op. 77, no. 2, Cherubini Quartet no. 1, D Minor, Schubert Quartet G Major, op. 161. Ref: JJC

15/3/1906: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (II Cyclus); All-Brahms Program: Quartet no. 3, B Major, op. 67, Quintet no. 1, F Major, op. 88, Sextet no. 1, B Major, op. 18 (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola; Hugo Dechert, 2nd violoncello). Ref: JJC

3/5/1906:

7/5/1906:

10/5/1906: Bechstein Hall, London
Joachim, Borwick, Sonatas of Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, and Brahms. Ref: The Times, London, 5 May, 1906.

Screenshot 2017-03-09 20.59.35

12/5/1906:

14/5/1906: Bechstein Hall, London
Joachim, Davies, Hausman, Trios of Beethoven and Brahms. Ref: The Times, London, 5 May, 1906.

Screenshot 2017-03-09 20.59.48

11/10/1906: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Karl Klingler substituting for Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (I Cyclus); Haydn Quartet C Major, op. 74, no. 1 (Peters no. 28), Mozart Quartet D Major, no. 24 (KV 499), Beethoven Quartet E flat Major, op. 127. Ref: JJC

13/10/1906: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
All-Bach Program for the benefit of the Bach Birth-house in Eisenach, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra (Georg Schumann, cond.), Jeannette Grumbacher – de Jong, Frieda Kwast – Hodapp, Joseph Joachim, Carl Halir, Bruno Hinze-Reinhold, August Scharrer; Bach Double Violiin Concerto (Joachim, Halir). Ref: JJC

8/11/1906: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Karl Klingler substituting for Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (I Cyclus); Schubert Quartet A Minor, op. 29, Beethoven Quartet F Major, op. 18, no.1, Schumann Quartet A Minor, op. 41, no. 1. Ref: JJC

13/12/1906: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Karl Klingler substituting for Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (I Cyclus); Mendelssohn Quartet E flat Major, op. 12, no. 2, Brahms Quartet A Minor, op. 51, no. 2, Beethoven Quartet F Major, op. 59., no. 1. Ref: JJC

1907

Screenshot 2017-03-09 20.40.00

Photo: Elliott and Frye

10/1/1907: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Karl Klingler substituting for Wirth, Hausmann), 1. Abend (II Cyclus); All-Beethoven Concert: Quartet A Major, op. 18, no. 5, Quartet F Major, op. 135, Quartet op. 59, no. 3. Ref: JJC

31/1/1907: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Karl Klingler substituting for Wirth, Hausmann), 2. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn Quartet G Major, op. 64, no. 4 (Peters no. 34), Beethoven Quartet B Major, op. 18, no. 6, Schubert Quintet C Major, op. 163 (Hugo Dechert, 2nd violoncello). Ref: JJC

28/2/1907: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Karl Klingler substituting for Wirth, Hausmann), 3. Abend (II Cyclus); Mozart Quartet B Major (“Hunt”), Schumann Quartet F Major, op. 41, no. 2, Brahms Quintet G Major, op. 111, no. 2 (Andreas Moser, 2nd viola). Ref: JJC

7/3/1907: Bösendorfer Saal, Vienna
Third Joachim Chamber Music Soiree, Joachim Quartet. Beethoven, String Quartet in C Minor, Op. 18, No.4, G Major, Op. 18, No. 2, F minor, Op. 95, F major, Op. 135. Ref: Schenker

8/3/1907Bösendorfer Saal, Vienna
Fourth Joachim Chamber Music Soiree, Joachim Quartet. Beethoven String Quartet in B flat Major, Op. 18, No. 6, F Major, Op. 59, No. 1, A Minor, Op. 132. Ref: Schenker

9/3/1907Bösendorfer Saal, Vienna
Fifth Joachim Chamber Music Soiree, Joachim Quartet. Beethoven, String Quartet in A Minor, Op. 18, No. 5, E flat Major, Op. 74 (“Harp”), C# Minor, Op. 131. Ref: Schenker

6/4/1907: Sing-Akademie, Berlin
Joachim Quartet (Joachim, Halir, Wirth, Hausmann), 4. Abend (II Cyclus); Haydn Quartet E flat Major, op. 64, no. 6, Beethoven Quartet D Major, op. 18, no. 3, Schubert Quartet D Minor, op. posth. (“Death and the Maiden”).  Ref: JJC


 

Joachim’s Jubilee: New-York Tribune (May 7, 1899)

New-York Tribune, 7 May, 1899, Illustrated Supplement


JOACHIM’S JUBILEE.

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HOW THE SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF

THE GREAT VIOLINIST’S FIRST AP-

PEARANCE WAS CELEBRATED

IN BERLIN.

Berlin, April 28.

The great hall of the Philharmonie was filled to overflowing on Saturday night, April 23, for the celebration of the jubilee of Joseph Joachim, who sixty years ago, a little boy, eight years old, made his first public appearance as a virtuoso in Budapest, and began the career which has made him the master violinist of Germany, and in the opinion of many of the whole world. Bach, Schumann, Mendelssohn, and the entire “noble army” of musicians, who as cameo reliefs on the pale green wall keep watch over the splendid hall, looked down on one of the most brilliant assemblies of famous men and women ever gathered together in Berlin to honor a man great “by the grace of God.” Musicians, artists, men of letters and learning, high officers and Ministers of State, with countless orders gleaming on their breasts, crowded the parquet, the boxes and the gallery to bear witness to the esteem in which they held Germany’s “grand old man.”

He sat there among them in the centre of the hall, in his big chair of honor, decorated with gorgeous azaleas, smiling on them all, pleased as a child and modest as only a great man can be. Only a few minutes before every one of those thousands of men and women, from the highest dignitary to the humblest music student at the far corners of the hall, had risen and cheered at his entrance, while the trumpets of three of the finest regiments in Berlin sounded a fanfare of welcome. How simple he was, as he came in, accompanied by a few devoted men, stopping to shake hands with a friend in the box above him, or laying his hand affectionately on the shoulder of an old colleague as he passed him on his way down the aisle! The shouts of the people and the blare of the trumpets did not for one moment distract his attention from the familiar faces that beamed on him from all sides.

Indeed, they were all familiar faces. Robert von Mendelssohn, the banker and ‘cellist, descendant of the great Felix, and Joachim’s friend for many years, sat in the chair to his right. Across the passage to his left was the beloved old professor, Hermann Grimm, who had composed the prologue for the occasion, and coming toward him to welcome him was his friend and neighbor, Herr von Keudell. In the orchestra, every member of which was standing and waving his or her handkerchief, stood Wirth and Hausmann, Halir, and Moser and Markees, the two capable instigators and managers of the festival, and, besides these, old friends and pupils from all over the world, gray-haired men, middle-aged men, boys and girls, and no one could make noise enough. When the trumpets had ceased and the vast audience was seated, Fraulein Poppe, of the Royal Theatre, came to the front of the stage and recited the anniversary poem which Professor Grimm had written. It was a touching tribute, which grew in eloquence and feeling up to the last words, which were addressed to the orchestra, and as one exquisite mellow voice 144 stringed instruments responded with the opening strains of the overture to Weber’s “Euryanthe.” If ever an orchestra was inspired, that one was! No one who was not there can realize how perfectly the love and devotion to Joachim which every performer felt were breathed into that beautiful music. The audience sat spellbound. And no wonder, for such a collection of artists never played together before. Every city in Germany which could boast of a violin virtuoso sent him to play on this unique occasion, and not only Germany, but England, whose devotion to the great master is almost, if not quite, as great as that of his own country, sent the best two professors of the London Conservatory to represent her. Scattered among the older men were a few young ones, present pupils of Joachim, and about a dozen young girls in their light dresses, some of them with their hair still hanging in braids down their backs—German, English, American.

After the Joachim Variations, played by Petri, of Dresden, and after the overtures of Schumann and Mendelssohn, the “Genoveva” and “Midsummer Night’s Dream” and the Brahms Symphony in C Minor, there were three stars on the Programme. “What did they mean?” Every one looked at every one else and nobody knew, but a surprise was evidently in store. Then a note from some one on the stage was carried to Joachim, and at the same moment the whole orchestra rose and began to croon softly the first measures of the Beethoven Concerto. Then all understood and cheered and clapped, but the master himself was of a different mind. He could be seen expostulating and gesticulating and shaking his head and sitting down, only to get up again to expostulate further. But the orchestra never stopped; the soft music went on insistently—it would not be denied. The people behind the boxes, standing on tables and chairs, leaned forward, not to lose a sight or sound. “They’re bringing his violin,” the whisper ran through the excited crowd; and, sure enough, there came three girls, a deputation of his favorite pupils, down the aisle toward him, holding out his wonderful Stradivarius.

When he took it in his hand the music suddenly ceased, and every drum and horn and fiddle began to pound and toot and shriek in a most enthusiastic “Tusch.” When he had taken his stand, the noble old man turned to the audience in a modest, deprecating way and said: “I haven’t practiced for three days and my hands ache. I have clapped so hard. There are many men in this orchestra who can play this better than I can, but if you really wish me to, I’ll do my best.” A pinfall could have been heard when he began. Every one sat breathless, expectant, and no one was disappointed. If another man in the world could have played better, no one in the audience would have conceded as much, for to a German a false note by Joachim, the “violin king,” is more inspired than the most perfect note of any other violinist living.

When he was through and had returned to his comfortable chair, they made him come back again and again and bow and bow, and were not satisfied until he took the baton in his hand and himself conducted the last number on the programme, the Bach Concerto in G Major. It was written for three violins, three violas, three ‘cellos and basso continuo, but was played by sixty-six violins, the number of the other instruments being increased in proportion. The whole orchestra remained standing throughout in honor of the director, and he deserved it, for Bach, in Joachim’s hands, has beauties which the most stubborn Philistine must feel.

The public had been requested to depart immediately after the close of the concert, that the room might be cleared for the banquet that was to be held there in honor of the hero of the evening, so the rank and file went early, leaving the more fortunate to enjoy the speeches and reminiscences of bygone times.

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Obituary: New-York Daily Tribune

New-York Daily Tribune (August 16, 1907) p. 7.

N. B.: Obituaries are posted for historical interest only, and should not be taken as sources of accurate biographical information.


jj-initials1-e1395761217629

JOSEPH JOACHIM DEAD.

––––––––––

Celebrated Violinist Passes Away in Berlin.

Berlin, Aug. 15.—Joseph Joachim, the celebrated violinist, conductor of the Royal Academy of Music, Berlin, and music director of the Royal Academy of Arts, died at 1:45 p.m. to-day. He had been suffering for a long time from asthma and had been unconscious for several days.

––––––––––

Joseph Joachim was born in Hungary, on July 15, 1831, [sic] and early in life attracted much attention by his rare skill as a violinist. He studied under the great masters and appeared at all the capitals of Europe while still a young man. He was created an honorary musical doctor of the University of Cambridge in 1877, and in 1882 was appointed conductor of the Royal Academy of Music in Berlin and music director of the Royal Academy of Arts.

Herr Joachim’s first appearance was made at Pesth, when, after two years’ study, he had attained his seventh year. He first became acquainted with the violin at Kitsee, [sic] a small village in the neighborhood of Pressburg, where he was born. At the age of five he began to learn the instrument. On his first appearance Joachim played a duet with his professor, a Polish maestro named Szervacsinsky, who directed the music at the Pesth Opera House. From Pesth he moved to Vienna, and from Vienna to Leipsic, where, in 1842, he visited Ferdinand David, the eminent violinist, for whom Mendelssohn wrote his famous concerto. David declined to give lessons to one who, he said, already played better than himself. But the experienced virtuoso helped the young player with his advice, and behaved in a fatherly way toward him during his stay at Leipsic, where he studied composition under Hauptmann, chiefly known in the present day as the friend and frequent correspondent of Spohr. In the early part of 1844 Joachim went to London with introductions from Mendelssohn, who, in a letter to Sterndale Bennett, said of him: “I assure you that, although he is only thirteen, I already regard him as one of my most intimate and dearest friends.” Soon afterward Mendelssohn himself went to London, and at a Philharmonic concert given under his direction the brilliant young violinist played in marvellous style the Beethoven concerto.

In 1848, at the age of eighteen, [sic] Joachim was nominated to the post of concert master and professor of the Leipsic Conservatory, in association with his friend, Ferdinand David. A year or two afterward he became, on Liszt’s invitation, concert master at Weimar, and later on received from the King of Hanover a like appointment at the Hanoverian court. Most of the artistic and literary centres of Germany were, indeed, well known to Herr Joachim when he was still a young man; and it must be mentioned that, apart from his musical instruction, he went through a course of study at Göttingen. At Paris he played with great success the year after his first visit to London. This visit was repeated from time to time with brief intervals until 1859; and since that year, from which dates the establishment of the popular concerts, he appeared in London almost every year. His visits to London were broken in 1905, and on August 27 of that year the music critic of The Tribune wrote, on receipt of news that Joachim was too ill to make the journey to England, “whither he has gone with great regularity to preach the evangel of his noble art for half a century,” as follows:

In 1889 he celebrated the semi-centenary of the beginning of his artistic career, and $25,000 was raised as the beginning of a fund for providing poor students at the Hochschule für Musik, which he founded in 1869, with fitting instruments. Last year the diamond jubilee of his first appearance in England was celebrated in Queen’s Hall, London, when a portrait painted by J. S. Sargent, R. A., was presented to him by the Right Hon. A. J. Balfour, and at a concert he conducted his own overture to “Henry IV” and played the Beethoven Concerto, which he had played in London for the first time at a concert of the Philharmonic Society under the direction of Mendelssohn on May 27, 1844. At a similar celebration in Berlin in 1899 past and present pupils of his to the number of 116 violins and violas, with twenty-four violoncellists who had attended his ensemble classes, took part in a concert conducted by Fritz Steinbach. From these circumstances it may be gathered how significant a figure Joachim has been in the musical life of the world since his advent as a prodigy nearly two generations ago.”

The critic of the Tribune quotes as follows from a monograph written by J. A. Fuller Maitland, the music reviewer of “The London Times.”

“Though it were universally conceded that the personal character and disposition of eminent men were to be guarded never so strictly from public inspection, yet in the case of public performers, where technical skill has reached its highest perfection, a kind of self-revelation takes place in every performance; and, besides the ideal interpretation of the music which he plays, Joachim unconsciously tells every one who has ears to hear what manner of man he is in himself. Truth, rectitude, earnestness of purpose, singleness of artistic aim, a childlike clarity of the inner vision, combined with the highest dignity—all these are evident to any but the most superficial listener, and there is a certain quiet ardor, eloquent of strong emotion strongly controlled, such as distinguishes only those who possess the highest imagination. It is recorded that on one occasion, when he played at first sight Schumann’s ‘Fantasia,’ for violin, the composer, instead of bursting into ecstasies over the player’s immediate grasp of the inner meaning of the music or the cleverness of his execution, whispered to his neighbor, ‘One can never love him enough.’ It is, perhaps, this power of stirring up a real personal affection in worthy hearers that is the greatest of all the player’s attributes, and such a power is indeed of priceless value.

“If one had to say in a word what was the secret of Joachim’s influence as an artist, one would surely say that this quality was that in which he stands alone among all the musicians who have ever lived. To hear him lead the Cavatina in Beethoven’s Quartet in B flat, Op. 130, or the Canzona in mode lidico from that in A minor, Op. 132, is to be allowed to gaze into the uttermost profundity of human emotion, into a depth far below the source of tears. In the former quartet two contrasting qualities of the great violinist’s art are set in close proximity, for the beginning of the finale is one of those things in which his youthful impetuosity is almost startlingly displayed. No one who has ever heard him lead a quartet of Haydn can have failed to realize that the dignity of a noble old age is associated with the insouciance, the buoyant fun and frolic of a schoolboy.”

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Walter Nithack-Stahn: Zum Gedächtnis Joseph Joachims

Zum Gedächtnis Joseph Joachims. Worte, gesprochen bei der Beisetzung am 19. August 1907, von Pfarrer W. Nithack-Stahn. [Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedächtnis-Kirche, Berlin]

Eckart: Ein deutsches Literaturblatt, Jahrgang 1907/8, Nr. 1, Oktober: 66-68.

Translation by Robert W. Eshbach below


image

Jakobus 1, Vers 17: “Alle gute Gabe und alle vollkommene Gabe kommt von oben herab, von dem Vater des Lichts.”


Ein Lied ist verhallt, die Melodie eines großen Menschenlebens. Und wie wenn der Meister seine Geige sinken läßt und alles in tiefem Schweigen verharrt, den nachschwingenden Tönen im Inneren lauschend — so ist uns zu Mute an dem Sarge. Euch vor allem, die ihr aus dem Vollklang dieses Lebens den schönsten Laut heraushören durftet: den der Vaterliebe. Aber weit hinaus über den Kreis derer, die ihm menschlich verbunden waren, weit über Länder und Meere, wo nur irgend ein Ohr und ein Herz ist, in das je ein Ton von ihm gedrungen, zittert ein Etwas von diesem Leben nach.

Uns aber ziemt es, nun das große Schweigen gekommen ist, in das alles Lebendige einmal versinkt, wie vor allen bedeutenden Wirklichkeiten, so auch vor dieser nachzusinnen, woher sie kam, und was sie uns bedeutet.

Und wenn wir dieses Menschendasein überblicken, wir können kaum anders, als in den Ruf ausbrechen: Welch ein Leben! Glück nennt man das, was einem Gutes scheinbar in den Schoß fällt — und was wäre ihm nicht zugefallen? Von sorglichen Eltern gepflegt, von verständnisvollen Freunden gefördert, in bester Schule gebildet, entzückt er als Kind schon Tausende, und der damaligen Welt nennt ihn “eine herrliche Erscheinung”. Und doch, kein überreitzter Wunderknabe — im gesunden Körper reift eine gesunde Seele heran. Als Jüngling steht er ebenbürtig neben den Meistern seiner Kunst, von ihnen neidlos bewundert und geliebt. Die Besten seiner Zeit werden ihm Freunde. Ein kunstliebender Fürst wirbt um seine Dienste. Eine Meisterin des Gesanges tritt ihm als Lebensgefährtin zur Seite.  Und während das neue Deutsche Reich zu erstehen beginnt, wird ihm der Ruf zuteil, in dessen Hauptstadt diese hohe Schule der Musik zu gründen. Fast vierzig Jahre währt seine Künstlerlaufbahn. In einem Alter, wo wir anderen noch in der Kinderstube spielen, dient er schon, ein kleiner Priester des Schönen. In Jahren, wo die meisten längst ihren Feierabend halten, waltet er seines Amtes, ohne an Muße zu denken. Was die Welt einem Künstler an Lorbeeren zu vergeben hat, hat er geerntet. Und als die Todeskrankheit über ihn kommt, darf er, getragen von Kindesdankbarkeit, zufrieden sprechen: “Es ist so schön, wenn man geliebt wird”, und endlich ohne Kampf entschlummern. Wahrlich, ein Erdenwallen, das an die Sonnenbahn des größten Dichters erinnert. Sollen wir von ihm sagen: er war ein Günstling des Schicksals. Oder sollen wir sagen: er hat sich seines Lebens Glück geschmiedet? Beides würde schwerlich in seinem Sinne sein. Das eine wäre ihm zu wenig fromm gedacht, das andere zu unbescheiden. “Die Kunst ist mir ein Heiligtum, ich könnte mein Leben mit Freude für sie hinopfern”, schreibt er als Achtzehnjähriger. Wer so spricht, der mißt sich selbst einen adeligeren Ursprung bei, als den, ein Produkt blinder Mächte oder eigenen Verdienstes zu sein. Sondern, was er ist und kann, gilt ihm als eine Gabe. Gute Gaben waren ihm in die Wiege gelegt, und zur Vollkommenheit hat er sie entwickelt, soweit das von einem Menschen gesagt werden kann. “Alle gute Gabe aber und alle vollkommene Gabe, — er wußte es, — kommt von oben herab “; sagen wir auch: “von unten herauf”, was liegt daran? Das Beste, was wir in uns tragen, was uns mit Schauern der Ehrfurcht und Liebe erfüllt, es stammte aus den höchsten Höhen, zu denen unser Gedanke schwindelnd emporsteigt, — es stammt aus den tiefsten Tiefen, in die wir staunend hinabblicken, dorther, wo die Quellen des Lebens rinnen; es stammt, — auch unser Toter hat sich dazu bekannt, — von dem “Vater des Lichts”, von dem alles Gute und Schöne geheimnisvoll ausstrahlt.

Und weil er seinen Genius ansah als etwas, das ihm gehörte und doch auch wieder nicht gehörte, darum gab er weiter, was ihm gegeben war, in selbstverständlicher Pflicht. Daher der eigentümliche Lebensernst, der schon an dem Knaben wohltuend auffiel und ihn von dem genialischen Gebahren schied, zu dem so mancher Hochbegabte sich berechtigt glaubt. Wahrlich, man kann zweifeln, was das Größere war von dem, was er uns gegeben hat: seine Kunst oder seine Persönlichkeit. Beides doch unzertrennlich. Was ein Künstler sei, er hat es uns wieder einmal gepredigt. Künstler sein, heißt nicht nur, ein Könner sein, — wer war ein solcher, wenn nicht er? — aber Künstler sein bedeutet mehr: ein ganzer Mensch sein, der eine eigene Welt im Busen trägt, eine Welt, die in heiligen Akkorden tönt, und der sie den Mitmenschen erschließt. Und wiederum daraus folgte die selbstlose Sachlichkeit dieses Künstlers, der in seinem Werke unterging. War’s nicht der Zauber, den er immer wieder übte, daß man den Tondichter selbst zu hören glaubte, den er wiedergab? Nenne man das ein seltenes Stilgefühl. Es war doch mehr: eine sittliche Kraft, die da wirkte; ja, eine religiöse Auffassung der Kunst, über der auch das Wort des Meisters von Nazareth schwebt: “Ich bin nicht gekommen, daß ich mir dienen lasse, sondern daß ich diene.” — Wer so den ganzen Menschen an die große Sache setzt, der kann nicht anders, als sein eigenes Menschentum nach allen Seiten hin vertiefen. So wundern wir uns nicht, daß dieser Musiker auch die Hochschule der Wissenschaft besucht; daß er, ein Lehrer von Weltruf, noch lernend im Hörsaale sitzt. Er war überzeugt: Man kann nicht genug sein, um aus sich etwas hervorzubringen. Und was war die treibende Kraft in ihm, ob er als Knabe mit Anspannung aller Sinne die Saiten des Lebens unter dem atemlosen Schweigen Tausender Beethovens Seele herausbeschwor; ob er als Leiter dieses Hauses nüchterne Tagesgeschäfte gewissenhaft erledigte oder ein Geschlecht von Schülern nach dem anderen bildete; ob er im engsten Kreis der Seinen der Hausmusik pflegte; ob er sein Können in den Dienst des Wohltuns stellte?

“Wenn ich mit Menschen- und mit Engelzungen redete, und hätte der Liebe nicht, so wäre ich ein tönendes Erz und eine klingende Schelle!” Ja, nennt es, wie ihr wollt, dieses wunderbare Etwas, ohne das auch die höchste Kunstfertigkeit, wie alles Menschentum, hohler Klang bleibt, nennt es: Liebe zur Sache, Liebe zur Idee — es ist doch im tiefsten Grunde Gottesliebe

Darum: ein deutscher Künstler war’s. Es ist wohl keine Überhebung, sondern auch nur dankbare Anerkennung dessen, was unserem Volke von oben herab gegeben wurde, wenn wir sagen: diese völlige Versenkung in die innere Welt ist deutsche Art. Er hatte sie. Auf fremdem Boden erwachsen, auf deutschen verpflanzt, hat er auch jene andere deutsche Gnadengabe bewährt: zu allen Völkern allverstehend und allverständlich zu reden in der Weltsprache der Töne.

Und ein Erzieher zur Kunst ist er gewesen. Zu der Kunst, die nicht nach Beifall hascht oder nach Golde drängt; zu jener verinnerlichten Kunst, die rein um ihrer selbst willen da ist und sich einfach gibt, ohne zu begehren.

In dieser Eigenart seines Wesens war es wohl tief begründet, daß sein Herz vornehmlich an den alten Meistern und ihren unmittelbaren Erbfolgern hing. Was Goethe einst aus Italien heimbrachte: Einfalt und Stille, das gaben ihm die Klassiker deutscher Musik. Das hat er nach kurzem Schwanken für immer festgehalten. Nicht, daß er neuen Bahnen sich verschloß. Nicht, daß er, der Landsmann Liszts, nicht auch mit diesem Freunde gefühlt hätte. Aber die Linie seines Innersten lief in anderer Richtung. Von dem geliebtesten Lehrer seiner Jugend, Mendelssohn, erbte er mehr als den Taktstock, seines Geistes Hauch. Und ganz aus der Seele war ihm der Ruf des Großen von Bayreuth: 

“Ehrt eure deutschen Meister!
So bannt ihr gute Geister!”

Großes war ihm gegeben — gute und vollkommene Gaben — Größeres gab er zurück.

Nun hat der, der ihn uns schenkte, diese seine Gabe wieder gefordert. Es ist ein sonderlicher und wehmütiger Gedanke, daß die Töne, die seine Saiten klangen, so, in dieser Persönlichkeitsstimmung, nie wieder durch die Welt erklingen werden.

Und wieder einmal geht ein Mitwirkender aus Deutschlands Heldenzeit dahin. Während man mit den Massen das Reich erkämpfte, hat er hier in der Hauptstadt sein klingendes Reich begründet und beherrscht und unser Volk groß machen helfen durch deutsche Art und Kunst. Hier war er für Unzählige das musikalische Gewissen. Nun ist er all den Meistern nachgegangen, die längst vor ihm verstummten.

“Aber, Freunde, nicht solche Trauertöne! Sondern laßt uns freudigere anstimmen!” Es gibt ein Gesetz von der Erhaltung der Kraft auch im geistigen Leben. Töne sind Wellen, die weiter fluten, unmeßbare Wirkung zeugend, durch die Äonen. Und mehr noch! Wenn in antiker Zeit ein Gottgeliebter starb, so tröstete man sich: “Ist der Leib zu Staub zerfallen, lebt der große Name noch.” 

Er, der hier vor uns ruht, glaubte Höheres. Nach Mendelssohns Tode schrieb er: “Wir wollen sehen, daß wir in seinem Geiste weiterarbeiten, auf daß wir dem erhabenen Ziele immer näher rücken, damit wir einst mit gutem Gewissen vor unseren Meister treten können” Das ist es, was wir hoffen. Und jedes Scheiden einer Persönlichkeit wie dieser stärkt uns von neuem in dem Glauben, daß wir mit dem, was licht in uns war, begnadet von ewiger Liebe, am Ziele unserer Erdentage eingehen dürfen zu dem Vater des Lichts.


imageKaiser-Wilhelm-Gedächtnis-Kirche, Berlin, ca. 1900


A song has died away, the melody of a great human life. And as when the master lowers his violin and everything remains in deep silence, listening to the resonating notes within – that is our mood at the coffin. Above all for you, who, out of the full resonance of this life, have been able to perceive the most beautiful sound: that of the Father’s love. But far beyond the circle of those who were humanly bound to him, far across lands and seas, where there is but one ear and one heart into which a single note of his has ever penetrated, something of this life reverberates.

But now that the great silence has come, into which all living things shall sink, it behooves us to reflect, as before all great realities, so also before this one, on whence it came and what it means to us. And as we survey this human existence, we can hardly help exclaiming: “What a life!” We call happy the good things that seem to fall into our lap — and what would not have befallen him? Nurtured by attentive parents, encouraged by understanding friends, educated in the best schools, he delighted thousands while still a child, and the world at that time called him “a marvelous phenomenon.” And yet, no overwrought Wunderkind — a healthy soul grows in a healthy body.  As a young man, he stands on a par with the masters of his art, admired and loved by them without envy. The best of his time become his friends. An art-loving prince solicits his services. A maestra of song joins him as a companion in life. And as the new German Empire begins to emerge, he is called upon to found this high school of music in its capital. His artistic career lasts almost forty years. At an age when the rest of us are still playing in the nursery, he is already serving, a little priest of beauty. In years when most people have long since retired, he performs his duties without a thought of leisure. What the world has to give an artist in the way of laurels, he has reaped. And when the fatal illness comes over him, he may, carried by childlike gratitude, say contentedly: “It is so beautiful to be loved,” and finally pass away without struggle. Truly, an earthly passage reminiscent of the sun’s-orbit of the greatest poet. Shall we say of him: he was a darling of destiny? Or shall we say: he has forged his own life’s happiness? Scarcely would either be true for him. The one would be too little respectful for him, the other too immodest. “Art is holy to me; I could gladly sacrifice my life for it,” he wrote as an eighteen-year-old. He who speaks in this way attributes to himself a nobler source than that of being a product of blind powers or of his own merit. Rather, what he is and can do comes to him as a gift. Good gifts were laid in his cradle, and he developed them to perfection as far as that can be said of a man. “But all good gifts and all perfect gifts,” — he knew it — “come down from above”; let us also say: “from below” — what is the matter with that? The best that we carry within us — what fills us with shivers of awe and love — came from the highest heights to which our thought dizzily ascends — it comes from the deepest depths into which we gaze down in wonder, from where the springs of life flow; it comes — even our departed one has confessed to this — from the “Father of Light” from whom all that is good and beautiful mysteriously radiates.

And because he saw his genius as something that belonged to him and yet did not belong to him, he passed on what was given to him as a matter of self-evident responsibility. Hence the peculiar seriousness about life, which was already agreeably noticeable in the boy and distinguished him from the genial behavior to which so many highly gifted people believe themselves entitled. Truly, one can question which was the greater of what he gave us: his art or his personality. Both are, after all, inseparable. He has admonished us once again what an artist is. To be an artist is not just to be an expert — who was such, if not he? — but being an artist means more: being a whole person who carries a world of his own in his bosom, a world that resounds in sacred chords, and who opens it up to fellow human beings. And again from this followed the selfless objectivity of this artist, who was submerged in his work. Wasn’t it in the magic he repeatedly worked that one thought to hear the tone-poet himself, whose composition he reproduced? One may call that a rare sense of style. It was more than that: it was a moral force at work; indeed, a religious conception of art, over which the words of the Master of Nazareth also hover: “I have not come that I might be served, but that I might serve.” — He who thus sets the whole man to the great cause cannot but deepen his own humanity on all sides. So we are not surprised that this musician also attends the University; that he, a teacher of world renown, still sits learning in the lecture hall. He was convinced: one can never be good enough to call forth something out of yourself. And what was the driving force in him, when he, as a boy, conjured up Beethoven’s soul, straining all his senses with the strings of life amid the breathless silence of thousands; when, as director of this house, he conscientiously attended to sober daily business or educated one generation of pupils after another; when he cultivated Hausmusik in his own intimate circle; when he put his skill at the service of charity?

“Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, and have not charity, I am become as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal.” Yes, call it what you will, this wonderful something, without which even the highest artistry, like all humanity, remains hollow sound; call it: love of the subject, love of the idea — it is, after all, in the deepest essence, love of God.

Therefore: it was a German artist. It is no exaggeration, but only grateful recognition of what has been given to our people from above, when we say: this complete immersion in the inner world is German in character. He had it. Reared on foreign soil, transplanted to German, he also proved that other German gift of grace: to speak to all peoples in an all-comprehending and all-comprehensible way in the world-language of tones.

And he was an educator for art. To the art that does not seek applause or strive for gold; to that innermost art that exists purely for its own sake and simply gives itself without demanding.

It was perhaps from this deeply rooted peculiarity of his nature that his heart was especially attached to the old masters and their immediate successors. What Goethe once brought home from Italy: simplicity and stillness — the classics of German music gave to him. After a short period of wavering, he held on to that forever. Not that he closed himself to new paths. Not that he, Liszt’s compatriot, did not also feel sympathy for this friend. But the line of his inner being ran in a different direction. From the most beloved teacher of his youth, Mendelssohn, he inherited more than the baton: the breath of his spirit. And completely from his soul was the call of the Master of Bayreuth:

“Honor your German masters!
This is how you summon good spirits!

Great things were given to him — good and consummate gifts — greater things gave he back.

Now the one who gave him to us has reclaimed his gift. It is a strange and melancholy thought that the notes which his strings sounded will never again resound through the world with his temperament.

And yet again, a member of Germany’s heroic era passes away. While struggling with the masses for the empire, he founded and ruled his sounding empire here in the capital, and helped to make our people great through German character and art. Here he was the musical conscience for countless people. Now he has followed all the masters who long before him fell silent.

“But, friends, not such sounds of mourning! Rather, let us sing more joyful ones!” There is a law of conservation of energy even in spiritual life. Sounds are waves that continue to flow, producing immeasurable effect, through the ages. And more! In ancient times, when a beloved of God died, people consoled themselves, “When the body has turned to dust, the great name lives on.”

He, who rests here before us, believed in higher things. After Mendelssohn’s death he wrote: “We wish to see to it that we continue to work in his spirit, so that we come ever closer to the sublime goal; so that we can one day stand before our master with a clear conscience.” That is what we hope. And every departure of a personality like this one strengthens us anew in the belief that we, with what light was in us, graced by eternal love, may approach the Father of Light at the end of our days on earth.


Translation: Ⓒ 2021 Robert W. Eshbach. Please acknowledge the source.


image

Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedächtnis-Kirche, Berlin, 1906

Gustav Eilers: Joseph Joachim (1890)

Gustav Eilers: Joseph Joachim (1890)

RP-P-1951-612

Portrait of Joseph Joachim at age 59, etching on paper by
Gustav Eilers (1834–1911), Berlin, 1890.

Published by Paul Bette.
Printer: Bruno Fischer.
Height 347 mm x width 268 mm.
High-resolution image.
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Object number RP-P-1951-612.


A signed copy of this portrait hangs in the venerable Zum Arabischen Coffe Baum in Leipzig, near Robert Schumann’s Stammtisch.


1890

Available from New York Public Library Music Division
Shelf locator: Muller Collection (Joachim, Joseph #12)
NYPL catalog ID (B-number): b16492080
Barcode: 33433017231303
Universal Unique Identifier (UUID): 287bf6a0-c59f-012f-711d-58d385a7bc34

https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47df-e2e4-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

 

 

Opera Performances in Weimar During Joachim’s Tenure as Concertmaster

Opera Performances in Weimar During Joachim’s Tenure as Concertmaster
as Advertised in the Weimarische Zeitung


1850

16. 10. 1850 Donizetti Die Favoritin
22. 10. 1850 Donizetti Lucia von Lammermoor
27. 10. 1850 Mozart Die Zauberflöte (Neu einstudirt)
2. 11. 1850 Flotow Martha
13. 11. 1850 Donizetti Marie, oder: Die Tochter des Regiments
16. 11. 1850 Meyerbeer Robert der Teufel
20. 11. 1850 Donizetti Die Favoritin
24. 11. 1850 Donizetti Marie, oder: Die Tochter des Regiments
26. 11. 1850 Spontini Die Vestalin (Neu einstudirt)
30. 11. 1850 Flotow Stradella
1. 12. 1850 Boieldieu Johann von Paris
7. 12. 1850 Boieldieu Johann von Paris
10. 12. 1850 Boieldieu Johann von Paris
15. 12. 1850 Spontini Die Vestalin
22. 12. 1850 Weber Der Freischütz
26. 12. 1850 Mozart Die Zauberflöte
29. 12. 1850 Kauer Die Saalnixe (Neu einstudirt)

1851

5. 1. 1851 Rossini Othello, der Mohr von Venedig
11. 1. 1851 Bellini Die Familien Capuleti und Montecchi
18. 1. 1851 Rossini Othello, der Mohr von Venedig
25. 1. 1851 Donizetti Marie, oder: Die Tochter des Regiments
1. 2. 1851 Lortzing Czaar und Zimmermann (Zum Erstenmale: Auf höchsten Befehl zum Vortheil der Hinterbliebenen des am 21. Januar 1851 verstorbenen Componisten)
8. 2. 1851 Donizetti Marie, oder: Die Tochter des Regiments
16. 2. 1851 Raff König Alfred (Zum Erstenmale) (not performed)
16. 2. 1851 Wegen Krankheit der Frl. Agthe und Heiserkeit mehrerer Mitglieder anstatt der angekündigten Oper “König Alfred”: Konzert. Unter Direktion und gefälliger Mitwirkung des Hof-Kapellmeisters Dr. F. Liszt (program listed)
2. 3. 1851 Lortzing Czaar und Zimmermann
5. 3. 1851 Donizetti Lukrezia Borgia
9. 3. 1851 Raff König Alfred (Premiere: Raff Cond.)
11. 3. 1851 Raff König Alfred (Wiederholung)
15. 3. 1851 Wagner Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf Wartburg
19. 3. 1851 Rossini Othello der Mohr von Venedig
23. 3. 1851 Lortzing Zaar und Zimmermann
29. 3. 1851 Donizetti Die Favoritin
1. 4. 1851 Bellini Die Familien Kapuleti und Montecchi
6. 4. 1851 Wagner Lohengrin
12. 4. 1851 Wagner Lohengrin
22. 4. 1851 Mozart Don Juan
30. 4. 1851 Donizetti Die Favoritin
3. 5. 1851 Raff König Alfred [Liszt?]
7. 5. 1851 Beethoven Fidelio
11. 5. 1851 Wagner Lohengrin
18. 5. 1851 Meyerbeer Robert der Teufel
25. 5. 1851 Auber Die Stumme von Portici [Große Oper in fünf Akten]
1. 6. 1851 Auber Fra Diavolo, oder Das Gasthaus in Terracina
9. 6. 1851 Flotow Martha, oder Der Markt von Richmond
14. 6. 1851 Bellini Norma
16. 6. 1851 Auber Die Stumme von Portici
18. 6. 1851 Donizetti Die Favoritin
21. 6. 1851 Mozart Don Juan [Letzte Abonnements-Vorstellung]
28. 6. 1851 Wagner Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf Wartburg [Zum Schluß der Bühne]

14. 9. 1852 Play: Goethe Clavigo [Zur Wiedereröffnung der Bühne]
20. 9. 1851 Lortzing Zaar und Zimmermann (not performed)
20. 9. 1851Konzert der Fräul. Dulcken
24, 9. 1851 Bellini Die Familien Capuleti und Montecchi
28. 9. 1851 Spontini Ferdinand Cortez oder Die Eroberung von Mexico
4. 10. 1851 Flotow Martha, oder: Der Markt von Richmond
12. 10. 1851 Spontini Ferdinand Cortez oder Die Eroberung von Mexico
18. 10. 1851 Weber Der Freischütz
26. 10. 1851 Mozart Don Juan
30. 10. 1851 Weigel Die Schweizerfamilie
1. 11. 1851 Spontini Ferdinand Cortez oder Die Eroberung von Mexico
5. 11. 1851 Weber Der Freischütz
16. 11. 1851 Flotow Stradella
23. 11. 1851 Herold Zampa, oder Die Marmorbraut
26. 11. 1851 Herold Zampa, oder Die Marmorbraut
30. 11. 1851 Bellini Norma
3. 12. 1851 Bellini Die Familien Kapuleti und Montecchi
7. 12. 1851 Herold Zampa, oder Die Marmorbraut substituted for Donizetti Lukrezia Borgia
10. 12. 1851 Donizetti Lukrezia Borgia
14. 12. 1851 Weber Preziosa
21. 12. 1851 Lortzing Zaar und Zimmermann
25. 12. 1851 Mozart Die Zauberflöte
29. 12. 1851 Mozart Don Juan

1852

4.1.1852 Mozart Die Zauberflöte
11. 1. 1852 Wagner Lohengrin
18. 1. 1852 Boieldieu Johann von Paris
24. 1. 1852 Wagner Lohengrin
26. 1. 1852 Donizetti Marie, oder: Die Tochter des Regiments
28. 1. 1852 Rossini Der Barbier von Sevilla
31. 1. 1852 Flotow Martha, oder: Der Markt von Richmond [Special guest appearance by Henriette Sonntag]
7. 2. 1852 Meyerbeer Die Hugonotten [4th act, together with ballet performance]
15. 2. 1852 Donizetti Der Liebestrank
22. 2. 1852 Donizetti Der Liebestrank
28. 2. 1852 Weber Preciosa
29. 2. 1852 Wagner Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf Wartburg
7. 3. 1852 Weber Der Freischütz
14. 3. 1852 Flotow Stradella
20. 3. 1852 Berlioz Benvenuto Cellini [Zum Erstenmale]
24. 3. 1852 Berlioz Benvenuto Cellini
28. 3. 1852 Lortzing Zaar und Zimmermann
4. 4. 1852 Konzert der Großherzogl. Hofkapelle im Hoftheater zum Besten des Pensionsfonds für die Witwen und Waisen verstorbener Hofkapellmitglieder.
17. 4. 1852 Berlioz Benvenuto Cellini
25. 4. 1852 Mozart Die Hochzeit des Figaro
2. 5. 1852 Kauer Die Saalnixe 1. Theil
9. 5. 1852 Kauer Die Saalnixe 1. Theil
15. 5. 1852 Wagner Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf Wartburg
29. 5. 1852 Wagner Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf Wartburg
31. 5. 1852 Flotow Stradella
1. 6. 1852 Lortzing Zaar und Zimmermann
3. 6. 1852 Wagner Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf Wartburg
5. 6. 1852 Wagner Lohengrin
13. 6. 1852 Schumann Manfred [Zum Erstenmale]
15. 6. 1852 Wagner Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf Wartburg
17. 6. 1852 Schumann Manfred
19. 6. 1852 Wagner Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf Wartburg

12. 9. 1852 Verdi Hernani [Zur Wiedereröffnung der Buhne: Zum Erstenmale]
19. 9. 1852 Verdi Hernani
26. 9. 1852 Mehul Jacob und seine Söhne
2. 10. 1852 Wagner Lohengrin
7. 10. 1852 Mehul Jacob und seine Söhne
13. 10. 1852 Donizetti Die Favoritin
16. 10. 1852 Donizetti Die Favoritin
24. 10. 1852 Spohr Faust [Zum Erstenmale]
27. 10. 1852 Spohr Faust
31. 10. 1852 Bellini Norma
7. 11. 1852 Flotow Martha, oder Der Markt von Richmond
14. 11. 1852 Spohr Faust
17. 11. 1852 Berlioz Benvenuto Cellini


Statistics

Auber Die Stumme von Portici (2)
            Fra Diavolo, oder Das Gasthaus in Terracina
Beethoven Fidelio
Bellini Die Familien Capuleti und Montecchi (4)
Die Nachtwandlerin
Norma (4)
Berlioz Benvenuto Cellini (5)
Boieldieu Johann von Paris (4)
Donizetti Der Liebestrank (2)
Die Favoritin (7)
            Lucia von Lammermoor
            Lukrezia Borgia (2)
            Marie, oder: Die Tochter des Regiments (5)
Flotow Martha, oder Der Markt von Richmond (5)
            Stradella (4)
Herold Zampa, oder Die Marmorbraut (3)
Kauer Die Saalnixe (1) plus 2 x 1. Theil
Lortzing Czaar und Zimmermann (7)
Mehul Jacob und seine Söhne (2)
Meyerbeer Meyerbeer Die Hugonotten [4th act]
Robert der Teufel (2)
Mozart Die Hochzeit des Figaro
Don Juan (4)
Die Zauberflöte (4)
Raff König Alfred 3
Rossini Othello, der Mohr von Venedig (3)
            Der Barbier von Sevilla
Schumann Manfred (2)
Spohr Faust (3)
Spontini Die Vestalin (2)
            Ferdinand Cortez oder Die Eroberung von Mexico (3)
Verdi Hernani (2)
Wagner Lohengrin (8)
Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf Wartburg (10)
Weber Der Freischütz (4)
            Preziosa (2)
Weigel Die Schweizerfamilie

= 117 performances of 37 different operas between 16. 10. 1850 and 30. 12. 1852.

Joseph Joachim in Venice, January 1880

Joseph Joachim in Venice, ca. January 12, 1880

Joachim toured Italy in January of 1880, playing in Milan, Nice, Turin, Genoa, Venice, Trieste, and then Graz, Vienna, Pest, Brno, and Prague, as well as in other Hungarian and Galician towns. This portrait was presumably done at that time. 

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p. 4. 

Josef Joachim will begin a six-week concert tour at the beginning of January, in the course of which he will visit Milan, Nice, Turin, Genoa, Venice, Trieste, Graz, Vienna, and Pest, along with some Hungarian cities, Brno, Prague, and the most outstanding cities of Galicia. In January he will be accompanied by the pianist Mr. Bonawitz and in February he will be joined by Johannes Brahms as a concert partner.

 

Concert: Berlin, Singakademie, December 1854—Concerts with Clara Schumann

Signale für die Musikalische Welt, vol. 12, no. 52 (December, 1854): 429-30.


Zwei Soireen von Frau Clara Schumann und Herrn Joachim, welche dieselben am 10. und 16. Dec. im Saale der Singacademie in Berlin gaben, waren sehr zahlreich besucht, das Programm ein ausgewähltes und die Executirung der einzelnen Nummern von rauschendem Applaus begleitet. Folgende Stücke kamen in der ersten Soiree zur Aufführung: Sonate für Clavier und Violine (A dur) von J. S. Bach. — Romanze in G dur für Violine von Beethoven. — Sinfonische Etuden für das Pianoforte von R. Schumann. — Ciaconne für Violine von J. S. Bach. — Andante und Scherzo aus der F moll–Sonate von J. Brahms. — Sonate für Pianoforte und Violine in A dur Op. 47 von Beethoven. Außerdem Gesangsvorträge des Herrn von der Osten. Die Nationalzeitung sagt unter anderen: Indem sich ein paar künstlerische Persönlichkeiten, aus so edlem Stoffe gebildet wie diese Beiden, zum Vortrag der Bach’schen A dur-Sonate und der Kreutzer-Sonate von Beethoven vereinigten, mußte natürlich die Wirkung eine überwältigende sein. Wir hatten überall den Eindruck der getreusten Reproduction und sahen einmal wieder von Angesicht zu Angesicht jene beiden größten Meister, welche die entgegengesetzten Grenzen eines langen, entwicklungsreichen Zeitraums bezeichnen und doch durch die innerste Verwandtschaft verbunden sind. Von der Pianistin allein hörten wir: Sinfonische Etuden in Form von Variationen von Robert Schumann, eine seiner geistreichsten und gediegensten Claviercompositionen, und Andante und Scherzo aus einer F moll-Sonate von Johannes Brahms. In beiden Werken be-

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wies sie wieder die bewunderungswürdigste Ausdauer, Fertigkeit und Energie des Ausdrucks. Die Sonate schließt sich der Schumannschen Richtung an und legt Zeugniß ab von einem hervorragenden Productions-Vermögen. Das Andante trägt das Motto: “Der Abend dämmert, das Mondlicht scheint, da sind zwei Herzen in Liebe vereint und halten sich selig umfangen.” Herr Joachim hatte sich zu seinen Soli die bekannte G dur-Romanze von Beethoven und Bachs berühmte Ciaconne gewählt. Der zarteste Duft und Farbenschmelz zeichnete die Eine, markige Kraft und meisterhafte Charakteristik die Andere aus. Herr von der Osten sang in seiner ansprechenden Weise die große Tenor-Arie aus der Schöpfung, ein sehr inniges, schon neulich von uns erwähntes Lied von Radecke und die Widmung von Schumann. Die zweite Soiree brachte folgende Werke: Sonate für Pianoforte in D moll von Robert Schumann. — Präludium und Fuge für Violine von Bach. — Variationen von Mendelssohn für Pianoforte, Op. 83. — Sonate für Pianoforte und Violine von Beethoven, Op. 30 in G dur. — Fantasiestück von W. Bargiel aus Op. 8. — Notturno in E moll von Chopin. — Rondo von Weber aus der C dur-Sonate für Pianoforte. — Präludium in E dur von J. S. Bach. Variationen von Paganini für Violine. Ferner trug der Sternsche Gesangverein zwei Lieder von Mendelssohn und zwei Lieder von Robert Schumann vor. Am 20. Dec. werden Clara Schumann und Joachim eine dritte und letzte Soiree geben.

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Two soirées given by Frau Clara Schumann and Herr Joachim on Dec. 10 and 16 in the hall of the Singakademie in Berlin were very well attended; the program was of outstanding quality and the execution of the individual numbers was accompanied by rapturous applause. The following pieces were performed in the first soirée: Sonata for piano and violin (A major) by J. S. Bach. — Romance in G major for violin by Beethoven. — Symphonic Etudes for pianoforte by R. Schumann. — Ciaconne for violin by J. S. Bach. — Andante and Scherzo from the F minor Sonata by J. Brahms. — Sonata for pianoforte and violin in A major Op. 47 by Beethoven. In addition, vocal performances by Mr. von der Osten. The Nationalzeitung says inter alia: When two artistic personalities, of such noble character as these two, unite for the performance of Bach’s A major Sonata and Beethoven’s Kreutzer Sonata, the effect must naturally be overwhelming. We had everywhere the impression of the most faithful reproduction and saw once again face to face these two greatest masters, who represent the opposite ends of a long, development-rich epoch and yet are connected by the innermost kinship. From the pianist alone we heard: Symphonic Etudes in the Form of Variations by Robert Schumann, one of his cleverest and most dignified piano compositions, and Andante and Scherzo from an F minor sonata by Johannes Brahms. In both works she again demonstrated the most admirable stamina, skill, and energy of expression. The sonata follows Schumann’s school and bears witness to an outstanding productive capacity. The Andante bears the motto: “The evening falls, the moonlight shines, two hearts united in love hold each other in blissful embrace.” Herr Joachim chose for his solos the well-known G major Romance by Beethoven and Bach’s famous Ciaconne. The most delicate fragrance and melding of colors distinguished the one, striking power and masterly characterization the other. Mr. von der Osten sang in his appealing manner the great tenor aria from The Creation, a very heartfelt song by Radecke which we mentioned recently, and the “Widmung” by Schumann. The second soirée featured the following works: Sonata for pianoforte in D minor by Robert Schumann. — Prelude and Fugue for violin by Bach. — Variations by Mendelssohn for pianoforte, Op. 83. — Sonata for pianoforte and violin by Beethoven, Op. 30 in G major. — Fantasy piece by W. Bargiel from Op. 8. — Notturno in E minor by Chopin. — Rondo by Weber from the C major Sonata for Pianoforte. — Prelude in E major by J. S. Bach. — Variations by Paganini for violin. In addition, the Sternsche Gesangverein performed two songs by Mendelssohn and two songs by Robert Schumann. On Dec. 20, Clara Schumann and Joachim will give a third and final soirée.

[Translation: Ⓒ 2021 Robert W. Eshbach]

A Letter of Joseph Joachim on Editing the “Chaconne” of Bach, May 6, 1879

Translation of the letter below



jj-initials

Ein Brief Joseph Joachims zur
Bearbeitungsfrage bei Bach

Mitgeteilt von Georg Kinsky (Köln).

Arnold Schering (ed.), Bach-Jahrbuch, Vol. 18 (1921): 98-100


In der im vorigen Bach-Jahrbuch (S. 30f.) erschienenen aufschlußreichen Abhandlung “Zu Joh. Seb. Bachs Sonaten und Partiten für Violine allein” von Andreas Moser ist auf die unerreichte Art der Wiedergabe der Solosonaten und insbesondere der Chaconne der d moll-Partita durch Joseph Joachim gebührend hingewiesen. Als eine kleine Ergänzung hierzu sei ein bisher anscheinend unbekannt gebliebener Brief [1] mitgeteilt, den der Meister der Geige im Jahre 1879 an Alfred Dörffel, den verdienten Mitarbeiter der Firma C. F. Peters in Leipzig, als Antwort auf das Anerbieten des Verlags schrieb, eine von ihm mit Vortragsbezeichnungen versehene Ausgabe der Chaconne zu übernehmen. Die Gründe, die Joachim zur Ablehnung dieses Ersuchens veranlaßten, und die daran geknüpften allgemeinen Erörterungen über Bezeichnungen in Neuausgaben klassischer Tonwerke sind reizvoll genug, um einen Abdruck des Briefes zu rechtfertigen, — wobei es außer Betracht bleiben kann, daß Joachim in späteren Jahren seine einstmaligen Bedenken aufgegeben und im Bunde mit seinem getreuen Mitarbeiter Moser die Herausgabe als der “beste Dolmetsch dieser Wundermusik” unternommen hat. [2] Es war seine letzte musikalische Arbeit, die ihn noch kurz vor seinem Heimgang unablässig beschäftigte. [3]

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Nach der Urschrift im “Musikhistorischen Museum von Wilhelm Heyer” in Köln hat das Schreiben folgenden Wortlaut:

[Berlin, 6. Mai 1879.]

            “Geehrter Herr Dörffel!

Ihr Herr Sohn hat mir Ihren Wunsch, die Chaconne betreffend, übermittelt. Vor allen Dingen muß ich Ihnen da meinen warmen Dank für die herzlich anerkennede Art, in der Sie mir aussprechen daß Sie an meiner Wiedergabe Bachscher Sachen Freude hatten, ausdrücken. Schon um Ihnen dafür auch etwas angenehmes zu erweisen möchte ich nun Ihrem Verlangen nachkommen die Chaconne nach meiner Art zu “bezeichnen” und namentlich die Arpeggien auszuschreiben. Aber wenn ich darüber nachdenke, so muß ich zu dem Resultat gelangen, daß gerade dies etwas unausführbares an sich hat: denn was Ihnen an meiner Wiedergabe wohl gefallen haben mag, ist wahrscheinlich daß sie frei klang und den Stempel des Reflektierten, in der Weise daß ich etwa das eine Mal genau wie das andere Mal nüancirte, nicht an sich trug. Die Wirkung der Arpeggien z. B. liegt für mich darin, ein breit angelegtes Crescendo derartig auszuführen, daß mit Steigerung der Tonstärke sich gegen Ende hin allmälig 5 und dann 6 Noten aus den vier 32steln entwickeln, bis die sechs Noten die Oberhand behalten, wo dann auch der Baß markirter hervortritt. Wann ich anfange mit den 5 oder 6 Noten, weiß ich wirklich selbst nicht: es wird je nachdem ich einmal früher oder später crescendire wechseln, was wieder von momentanen Dingen abhängt, wie von minder oder mehr erregter Stimmung, besseren oder schlechteren Bogenhaaren, die leichter im piano oder im forte ansprechen, dünnern oder dicker Saiten, ja was weiß ich von welchen Zufälligkeiten! Aber aufschreiben läßt sich’s meines Erachtens nicht. Täte man’s in einer oder der andern Manier, so würde der Bachsche Text zu subjektiv gefärbt dastehen. — Und da sind wir leider an einem wunden Punkt der meisten Herausgeber unserer Zeit angelangt, der mir (ich darf es Ihnen an dieser Stelle offen gestehen) z. B. schon Davids in vieler Hinsicht höchst verdienstlichen Arbeiten bis zu einem Grade verleidet, daß ich immer trachte von andern Exemplaren als den seinen zu spielen. Man bezeichnet, man arrangirt heutzutage wirklich viel zu viel an fremden Sachen — (die eignen bezeichne man so peinlich genau wie möglich!). Wer nicht als Spieler eine so allgemeine musikalische Bildung, eine so warme Empfindung für die Componisten hat, daß sich ihm das Technische wie Geistige aus eignem Verständnis ergiebt, der bleibe überhaupt davon, sie vor anderen Menschen zu spielen. Das ist wohl für einen Schulmeister, der ich ja jetzt bin, gar wenig pädagogisch?! Vielleicht — indeß scheint mir die Aufgabe des Lehrers auch nicht die zu dressieren, sondern zu dem oben gewünschten Grade des Verständnisses hinzu-

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leiten, wobei gewiß manches von David Gebrachte auch noch seinen anregenden Nutzen haben kann, der ja ein feiner Kopf und tüchtiger Künstler war. Aber in Bausch und Bogen führt unser modernes für Conservatorien “zum Gebrauch herzurichten” zur Manier. Schon deshalb, weil manche oft gerechtfertigte leise Vortragsregung durch aufschreiben geradezu vernichtet wird — ein gestochenes cresc: mf, f, ff sieht Einen gar derb an, und hört sich noch härter und aufdringlicher an in Ton übersetzt! — Aber nun habe ich nicht nur Ihnen Ihren schmeichlhaften Wunsch nicht erfüllt, sondern auch noch eine Art langweiliger Vorlesung gehalten, und ich habe nichts zu meiner Entschuldigung vorzubringen, als daß wenigstens Ihnen gegenüber meiner Gesinnung unrecht geschehen würde, wenn Sie sagten: qui s’excuse s’accuse. Ich hätte gern willfahrt!

In vorzüglicher Hochachtung

Joseph Joachim”


3. Beethovenstrasse, N. W. Thiergarten
[Berlin, 6 May 1879.]

Dear Mr. Dörffel!

Your son has sent me your request concerning the Chaconne. Above all, I must express my warm thanks to you for the cordially complimentary way in which you tell me that you enjoyed my rendition of Bach’s things.

If only to return your kindness, I would like to fulfill your request to “mark” the Chaconne in my way and, in particular, to write out the arpeggios.

But when I think about it, I have to conclude that precisely this has something unworkable about it: for what you may have liked about my rendition is probably that it sounded free and did not carry the stamp of the reflective, such that I did not play with exactly the same nuances from one time to another.

For me, for example, the effect of the arpeggios comes from producing a broadly conceived crescendo in such away that, with the increase in tone strength, 5 and then 6 notes develop from the four 32nds, until the six notes gain the upper hand, and the bass then also emerges more markedly.

I really don’t know myself when I start with the 5 or 6 notes: it will vary, depending on whether I crescendo sooner or later — which again depends on momentary matters, such as less or more aroused mood, better or worse bow hair which speaks more easily in the piano or in the forte, thinner or thicker strings, ahh, I don’t know what unforseen eventualities! But, in my opinion, it cannot be written down. If one were to do it in one or the other manner, Bach’s text would be too subjectively colored. — And here, unfortunately, we have reached a sore point which concerns most of the editors of our time, (I may frankly admit to you at this point), for example, even David’s works, which are in many respects highly commendable, but that annoy me to a degree that I always try to play from copies other than his.

Nowadays, people mark, people arrange really far too much on other people’s things — (on one’s own things, one’s markings should be as meticulously detailed as possible!).

He who does not have a sufficiently general musical education as a player, a sufficiently warm feeling for the composer, such that the technical as well as the spiritual emerges from his own understanding, should refrain from playing for others.

For a schoolmaster, which I am now, that is hardly pedagogical?! Perhaps — in the same way, the teacher’s task does not seem to me to be to train, but to add to the above-desired degree of understanding, whereby certainly some of the editions by David, who was a fine head and a skilled artist, can still have their stimulating benefit.

But, all in all, our modern practice of arranging “for practical use” for conservatories leads to mannerism.

For the same reason that some often-justified quietly spoken aside in a lecture can be well-nigh ruined by writing it down — one may regard an engraved cresc: mf, f, ff crudely, and it sounds even harder and more intrusive translated into tone! — But now I have not only not fulfilled your flattering wish, but also given a kind of boring lecture, and I have nothing to say in my defense than that at least you would be unjust toward my disposition if you were to say: qui s’excuse s’accuse.

I would gladly have consented!

Respectfully yours,

Joseph Joachim

[Translation © Robert W. Eshbach, 2021]


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Holograph, dated in another hand 6 and 7 Mai, 1879, in The Royal Academy of Music, London. Foyle Menuhin Archive Accession No. 2005.2446.

[1] In der dreibändigen Ausgabe der “Briefe von und an Joseph Joachim” (Berlin 1911-13) ist das Schreiben nicht enthalten.

[2] J. S. Bach, “6 Sonaten für die Violine allein.” Neue Bearbeitung …. (Berlin 1908, Ed. Bote & Bock).

[3] A. Moser, “Joseph Joachim. Ein Lebensbild,” 2. Bd. (Berlin 1910) S. 328 f.